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German D. Garcia

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German D. Garcia
German Garcia.jpg
Former candidate for
Board member, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Board of Education, At-large
PartyDemocratic
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Military service
Service/branchU.S. Army
Personal
ProfessionTeacher
Websites
Campaign website
German D. Garcia campaign logo
German "Herman" D. Garcia was a Democratic candidate for an at-large seat on the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Board of Education in North Carolina. Garcia, Elisabeth Motsinger and Katherine Fansler faced three Republican candidates in the general election on November 4, 2014. German D. Garcia lost the general election on November 4, 2014.

Biography

Garcia currently works as an assistant teacher with Petree Elementary School. He served in the U.S. Army and retired at the rank of major.[1]

Elections

2014

See also: Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools elections (2014)

Opposition

German D. Garcia advanced from the May 6, 2014, Democratic primary against Elisabeth Motsinger, Donald Dunn, Katherine Fansler and Suzanne Carroll. Garcia, Fansler and Motsinger faced Republican candidates Mark Johnson, John M. Davenport Jr. and Robert Barr in the November 4, 2014, general election.

Results

General
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, At-Large General Election, 4-year term, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngElisabeth Motsinger Incumbent 18.4% 52,582
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRobert Barr 17.1% 48,789
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMark Johnson 16.9% 48,418
     Democratic Katherine Fansler 16.8% 48,115
     Republican John M. Davenport Jr. Incumbent 16.5% 47,125
     Democratic German D. Garcia 14.2% 40,636
Total Votes 285,665
Source: North Carolina Board of Elections, "2014 General Election Results," accessed December 30, 2014
Primary
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, At-Large Primary Election, 4-year term, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngElisabeth Motsinger Incumbent 33% 11,233
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngKatherine Fansler 22.2% 7,561
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGerman D. Garcia 17.7% 6,038
     Democratic Suzanne Carroll 14.5% 4,918
     Democratic Donald Dunn 12.6% 4,278
Total Votes 34,028
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections, " 05/06/2014 OFFICIAL PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS - FORSYTH," May 13, 2014

Funding

Garcia reported $199.00 in contributions and $99.00 in expenditures to the Forsyth County Board of Elections, leaving his campaign with $100.00 on hand as of April 30, 2014.[2]

Endorsements

Garcia received the endorsement of the Winston-Salem Journal for the primary election.[1] He and Katherine Fansler (D) shared a joint recommendation from the paper for the third at-large seat up for election in the general election.[3]

Campaign themes

2014

Garcia provided the following statements regarding his campaign themes on his Democracy.com campaign page:

While the NC General Assembly fights over the education budget, recruiters from the Houston School District (yes, in Texas) are back in NC.

NC educators have not had a meaningful raise in six years, and budget cuts have caused a deficit in resources, such as textbooks. Currently, NC's education spending per child is 49th in the nation, even though our cost of living is approximately average. Tens of thousands of educators have taken early retirement, moved to other states, or left the profession.

Educators should be treated as valuable professionals, and children deserve a high quality public education. But NC budget cuts have made it difficult to attract and retain highly qualified teachers, and in many schools, there are not enough textbooks and other educational resources. It is a shame that recruiters from other states are aggressively recruiting experienced, highly qualified teachers away from NC...

Statistics for WSFC Schools: 42 percent are white, 29 percent are African-American, 22 percent are Hispanic, 4 percent are multiracial.

According to statistics available from WSFC website, we have a diverse student population, with 42% white, 29% African American, and 22% Hispanic.

German believes that all students and their families deserve representation on our school board. With several of the current school board members retiring this year, this upcoming election is an excellent opportunity to elect a highly qualified Hispanic member to our Board of Education. German is an educator (named Classified Employee of the Year at Petree, and a language teacher at FTCC) committed to being an advocate for all students and educators...

The NC General Assembly is still debating the education budget for this coming fiscal year.

After six years without giving educators a raise, the House wants to give a 5 to 6% raise, while the Senate wants to give a higher raise by firing half of our teacher assistants.

Teacher assistant positions have been reduced for the past several years due to budget cuts, reducing the ability of elementary school educators to provide individualized instruction to young learners. It should not come as a surprise, therefore, that thousands of children are in summer school this year because they are not reading at grade level.

NC has also lost many qualified teachers to other states, and fewer college students are choosing education as their major. Currently, we are 46th in teacher pay and 48th in spending per student. When we consider that our cost of living is approximately average (26th), it is not surprising that we are having difficulty recruiting and retaining teachers. All of our educators deserve a long overdue raise, and our students deserve a quality education which includes teacher assistants in elementary school classrooms.

I am an advocate for our public schools because I believe that all children deserve the opportunity to get a great education. I have attended education rallies in Winston-Salem and Raleigh. I will continue to be an advocate for our schools and our children.[4]

—German D. Garcia's Democracy.com page, (2014)[5]

About the district

See also: Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, North Carolina
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools is located in Forsyth County, North Carolina
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools is located in Winston-Salem, the county seat of Forsyth County, North Carolina. According to the United States Census Bureau, Forsyth County is home to 361,220 residents.[6] Forsyth County Schools is the fourth-largest school district in North Carolina, serving 53,340 students during the 2011-2012 school year.[7]

Demographics

Forsyth County outperformed the rest of North Carolina in terms of higher education achievement in 2012. The United States Census Bureau found that 31.6 percent of Forsyth County residents aged 25 years and older had attained a bachelor's degree compared to 26.8 percent for North Carolina as a whole. The median household income in Forsyth County was $45,809 compared to $46,450 for the state of North Carolina. The poverty rate in Forsyth County was 17.6 percent compared to 16.8 percent for the entire state.[6]

Racial Demographics, 2012[6]
Race Forsyth County (%) North Carolina (%)
White 68.0 71.9
Black or African American 27.1 22.0
American Indian and Alaska Native 0.8 1.5
Asian 2.1 2.5
Two or More Races 2.0 2.0
Hispanic or Latino 12.4 8.7

Presidential votes, 2000-2012[8]
Year Democratic vote (%) Republican vote (%)
2012 53.0 45.8
2008 54.8 44.3
2004 45.5 54.1
2000 43.0 56.0

Note: The United States Census Bureau considers "Hispanic or Latino" to be a place of origin, not a race. Therefore, the Census allows citizens to report both their race and that they are from a "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin simultaneously. As a result, the percentages in each column of the racial demographics table will exceed 100 percent. Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin percentages, although rounding by the Census Bureau may make the total one- or two-tenths off from being exactly 100 percent.[9] This Ballotpedia page provides a more detailed explanation of how the Census Bureau handles race and ethnicity in its surveys.

Recent news

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See also

External links

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References