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Germantown New Elementary School (2008)

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The Germantown New Elementary School referendum was a school bond issue on the November 4 ballot in the School District of Germantown, which is in Washington County. The purpose of the referendum was to issue debt in the amount of $22,500,000 for the school budget. The additional funds would be used for the construction of a new elementary school, various district wide directives, and new furnishings and equipment.

Germantown school board members were making the claim that the new school will pay for itself without raising property taxes because it will increase enrollment, which would in turn increase state aid to the district.[1]

Also on the Nov. 4 ballot is a referendum meant to exceed annual revenue caps every year in order to pay the general maintenance costs of the new construction. See Germantown Exceed Revenue Limits (2008) for more information. Both of the measures were defeated.

Text of measure

BE IT RESOLVED by the School Board of the Germantown School District, Washington County, Wisconsin that there shall be issued pursuant to Chapter 67 of the Wisconsin Statutes, general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $22,500,000 for the public purpose of paying the cost of constructing a new elementary school on school district property next to Kinderberg Park; technology, safety and security initiatives District wide; and acquiring furnishings, fixtures and equipment."[2]

Result

Defeated by 6,264 to 8,669.

Support

The group United for a Better Germantown support the referendum, saying that "Successful passage of this referendum will help maintain Germantown as a district of choice for families looking for a community to raise their families."[3]

Opposition

The Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance question the claim that the new construction will pay for itself without raising property taxes.[4]

External links

References