Glenn McConnell

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Glenn McConnell
Glenn mcconnell.jpg
Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina
Former officeholder
In office
March 13, 2012 - June 18, 2014
PartyRepublican
PredecessorKen Ard (R)
Leadership
President Pro Tempore, South Carolina State Senate
2001-2012
Elections and appointments
Term limits2 terms
Prior offices
South Carolina State Senate District 41
1980-2012
Education
Bachelor'sCollege of Charleston (1969)
J.D.University of South Carolina Law School (1972)
Personal
BirthdayDecember 11, 1947
Place of birthCharleston, SC
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionEpiscopal
Websites
Personal website
Campaign website
Glenn McConnell (b. December 11, 1947, in Charleston, South Carolina) was the 89th Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina. McConnell assumed this position on March 13, 2012, taking the place of former Lt. Gov. Ken Ard, who resigned amid a criminal investigation into his campaign spending.[1]

Instead of run for a full, four-year term in 2014, McConnell stepped down as lieutenant governor on June 18, 2014 to become the new president of the College of Charleston.[2][3][4] He was replaced by Democratic State Senator John McGill.[5]

McConnell previously represented the 41st District in the South Carolina State Senate from 1981-2012, and was Senate President Pro Tempore from 2001-2012. Serving in this role made him the next in the line of succession for lieutenant governor. However, as President Pro Tempore, McConnell held much more power, leading to speculation that he would resign as Pro Tem in order to allow someone else to take the post, and then ask to be re-elected as Pro Tem.

In the end, McConnell accepted the lieutenant governorship, pointing to his dedication to the state Constitution.

"It is more important that I exercise the duties of the office for which I have been elected and uphold my oath. I will not contort the words of both the Constitution and my oath of office to keep a position that I might personally prefer."[6]

—Glenn McConnell, [7]

Both of McConnell's lieutenant governor succession sagas are covered in greater depth at: The dreaded promotion: South Carolina's lieutenant governorship.

McConnell's office bio listed the following legislative goals: "Control the rate of growth in government, hold down taxes, create educational opportunities, protect the public from crime."[8]

Biography

McConnell was born December 11, 1947, in Charleston, South Carolina. He graduated from Saint Paul's High School, the College of Charleston (B.S., 1969) and the University of South Carolina School of Law (J.D., 1972). After graduating from law school, McConnell worked as a staff attorney for Neighborhood Legal Assistance Program. He later worked as a Labor Relations Specialist for the United States Charleston Naval Shipyard, after which he entered private practice. He retired from active practice and managed a family business with his brother until his retirement in 2009.[9]

Education

  • B.S., College of Charleston (1969)
  • J.D., University of South Carolina (1972)

Political career

Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina (2012-2014)

See also:The dreaded promotion: South Carolina's lieutenant governorship

McConnell first assumed the office of Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina on March 13, 2012, following the resignation of former Lt. Gov. Ken Ard. At the time, McConnell was Senate President Pro Tempore and next in line to succeed the lieutenant governor in the event of a vacancy, therefore he took over the position- ostensibly to serve the remainder of Ard's unexpired term. While displeased with the circumstances calling for his sudden transition out of the Senate and into the lieutenant governor's office, McConnell stated that "his strong commitment to the State Constitution and public service made it impossible to remain in his influential seat."[9]

McConnell vacated the lieutenant governor's office on June 18, 2014, about six months before his term's scheduled end-date, in order to begin his new position as president of the College of Charleston. The then-Senate President Pro Tempore, John Courson, would normally have followed in McConnell's footsteps, however Courson, in contrast with McConnell in 2012, is demurring from his prospective succession.[4] A solution was discovered when the State Senate temporarily made Democrat John McGill the president pro tempore, allowing McGill to become lieutenant governor instead of Courson.

South Carolina State Senate (1980-2012)

McConnell is a former member of the South Carolina State Senate, representing the 41st District from 1980 to 2012. He was the President Pro Tempore in the senate from 2001 to 2012.

According to an October 2010 report by The Nerve, McConnell recorded salary and expenses of $133,529 for the 2.5-year period from Jan. 1, 2008, through mid 2010, making him the highest-compensated legislator in South Carolina during that period.[10]

Committee assignments

2011-2012

In the 2011-2012 legislative session, McConnell served on the following committees:

2009-2010

In the 2009-2010 legislative session, McConnell served on the following committees:

Roll call voting


S.C. Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn McConnell reacts to those who claim he's not "transparent" enough regarding the issue of roll-call voting

In South Carolina, only 25 percent of all bills were recorded during the 2009 session. A roll-call voting bill passed the House in the June 2010 session but that bill died in the Senate. Senator McConnell and Senator Jake Knotts contested the bill in the Senate -- preventing it from moving forward.[11]

Elections

2014

See also: South Carolina Lieutenant Gubernatorial election, 2014

McConnell is not running for election to a four-year term as South Carolina Lieutenant Governor in the 2014 elections.[3]

2008

McConnell won re-election for District 41 of the South Carolina State Senate with 33,449 votes, ahead of write-ins (412).[12]

He raised $278,264 for his campaign.[13]

South Carolina State Senate, District 41
Candidates Votes
Green check mark transparent.png Glenn McConnell (R) 33,449
Write-ins 412

Campaign contributions

Comprehensive donor information for McConnell is available dating back to 1996. Based on available campaign finance records, McConnell raised a total of $1,108,816 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 10, 2013.[14]

Glenn McConnell's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2010 SC State Senate Not up for election $151,710
2008 SC State Senate Won $278,264
2006 SC State Senate Not up for election $175,683
2004 SC State Senate Won $403,349
2002 SC State Senate Not up for election $10,450
2000 SC State Senate Won $31,900
1996 SC State Senate Won $57,460
Grand Total Raised $1,108,816

2008

Ballotpedia collects information on campaign donors for each year in which a candidate or incumbent is running for election. The following table offers a breakdown of Glenn McConnell's donors each year.[15] Click [show] for more information.


Scorecards

The Palmetto Liberty PAC Scorecard

See also: The Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee's Legislative Score Card

The Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee, a conservative pro-limited government think tank in South Carolina, releases its Scorecard for South Carolina Representatives and Senators once a year. The Scorecard gives each a legislator a score based on how they voted in the two-year legislative term prior to the election on specific issues which the Palametto Liberty PAC thought were anti-limited government. "Most of the votes shown on the score card are votes that we lost. Now we can identify the Legislators that caused us to lose these votes. These Legislators are the ones who need to be replaced if we are to achieve the vision of having the most free state in the nation."[16]

2012

Glenn McConnell received a score of *% in the 2012 score card, ranking 37th out of all 46 South Carolina Senate members.[17] His score was followed by Senators Floyd Nicholson (6%), John L. Scott, Jr. (6%), and Vincent A. Sheheen (6%).[18]
Note: McConnell's exact score is unavailable as he left office mid-term. His ranking still stands.

Recent news

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Glenn McConnell News Feed

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See also

Additional reading

External links

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

The Internet Archive's Wayback Machine was used to recall this version of the website from October 20, 2011.


The Internet Archive's Wayback Machine was used to recall this version of the website from March 10, 2012.


The Internet Archive's Wayback Machine was used to recall this version of the website from October 11, 2011.


References

  1. Washington Post, "SC's lieutenant governor resigns amend criminal probe of campaign spending for personal items," Friday March 9, 2012
  2. The State, "SC’s libertarian Republicans take aim at chairman, Graham," May 4, 2013
  3. 3.0 3.1 The State, "McConnell: Why I will not seek election as lieutenant governor," January 6, 2014
  4. 4.0 4.1 The State, "McConnell named College of Charleston president," March 24, 2014
  5. [ http://www.thestate.com/2014/06/18/3515963/after-delay-democrat-mcgill-becomes.html The State, "After delay, Democrat McGill becomes SC interim lieutenant governor," June 18, 2014]
  6. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  7. The State, "McConnell: ‘I have a moral obligation’," March 10, 2012, accessed May 2, 2014
  8. Office of the South Carolina Lieutenant Governor, "Meet Glenn McConnell," Accessed July 18, 2013
  9. 9.0 9.1 South Carolina Lieutenant Governor, "Biography: Glenn McConnell," accessed May 21, 2012
  10. Lawmakers Cost Taxpayers Millions, The Nerve, Oct. 6, 2010
  11. Roll-Call voting bill fizzles in Senate
  12. South Carolina official election results for 2008
  13. Follow the Money's report on McConnell's 2008 campaign contributions
  14. Follow the Money, " Career fundraising for Glenn McConnell," accessed May 10, 2013
  15. Follow the Money.org
  16. The Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee, "Voting Records," accessed April 11, 2014
  17. Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee, "South Carolina Senate Score Card 2012," accessed May 15, 2014
  18. Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee: South Carolina Senate Score Card 2012, 2012
Political offices
Preceded by
-
South Carolina State Senate - District 41
July 23, 2012-November 12, 2012
Succeeded by
Walter Hundley (R)
Preceded by
Ken Ard (R)
Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina
2012-2014
Succeeded by
John McGill