Henderson, Kentucky

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Transparency grading process
Henderson is the tenth largest city in Kentucky. It is the county seat of Henderson County. In the 2010 census, Henderson's population was 28,757. It is a part of the Evansville, Indiana, metropolitan area commonly known as Kentuckiana.[1]

Website evaluation

See also: Evaluation of Kentucky city websites


The good

  • A budget is posted online.[2]
  • Property tax information is online.[3]
  • Meetings information is posted online.[4]
  • Information on how to get a building permit is posted online, but there is not information about zoning.[5]
  • Audits are on the city's website.[6]

The bad

  • Contact information for elected officials is not posted online.
  • Administrative officials are not posted online.
  • Information on contracts is not posted online.

Elected Officials

Elections for Mayor and City Commissioner are nonpartisan and at large (no wards are designated). They are held in November of each even-numbered year. The Mayor is elected for a four-year term, while each Commissioner is elected to a two-year term.[7]

The Board of Commissioners is composed of a Mayor and four Commissioners operating under the City Manager Plan (KRS 83A.150). Under this form of government, which was adopted by public referendum in 1966, legislative authority is vested in the Board of Commissioners and administrative responsibilities are carried out by an appointed City Manager. As the policy-making body for Henderson, the Board is the final authority on most matters relating to the City.[8]

The Mayor presides over meetings of the Board, serves as the ceremonial head of government, and votes on all matters. The Mayor does not have veto power and has no regular administrative duties.[9]

The Board of Commissioners elects one of its members to serve as Mayor Pro Tem following each election. Traditionally, the Commissioner chosen as Mayor Pro Tem, who serves in the absence of the Mayor, is the Commissioner receiving the most votes in the general election.

All regularly scheduled Board of Commissioners' meetings are held in the Third Floor Assembly Room at the Municipal Center, 222 First Street. Meetings are held every second and fourth Tuesday night of each month, at 5:30 p.m. They can be viewed live on cable television, via the local Public Access channel. In addition, work sessions are held on the third Tuesday of each month on the second floor of the Municipal Center. All meetings are open to the public.[10]

Salaries

Grades and salary ranges for most city employees can be found on page 83 of the city's budget, but elected officials' salaries are not included.[11]

According to Bowling Green's website, however, Henderson's mayoral salary is $17,369.22, and their commissioners' are $17,369.22.[12]

Public employees

In the 2011 budget, Henderson had 314 employees.[13] They are employed in the following divisions:

  • General government administration - 22.25
  • General government finance - 33.75
  • Police officers - 61.75
  • Police civilians - 8
  • Police 911 communications - 15.25
  • Firefighters - 58
  • Civilians - 2
  • Parks and recreation - 13
  • Mass transit - 14
  • Gas system - 28
  • Sanitation - 18.5
  • Cemetery - 4
  • Public works - 35.5

The city budget also lists key city personnel.[14] They are:

  • City Manager - Russell Sights
  • Assistant City Manager - William Newman, Jr.
  • City Attorney - Joseph Ternes, Jr.
  • City Clerk - Carolyn Williams

Grades and salary ranges for all city employees can be found on page 83 of the city's budget.[15]

Emergency personnel

The fire chief is Daniel Froehlich, who leads the 58-person fire department. The police chief is John Reed, Jr., who leads the 85-person police department.[16]

Stimulus spending

The stimulus projects in Henderson, Kentucky, are[17]:

  • Complete Lumbar, Inc. - $26,135
  • Tesco Development - $173,859
  • Henderson County School District - $17,702
  • Henderson County Child-Victim Task Force - $49,316
  • City of Henderson - $123,100
  • Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Kentucky - $1,173,502
  • Housing Authority of Henderson - $926,853
  • Pittsburgh Tank and Tower Company - $80,000
  • City of Henderson - $330,000
  • City of Henderson - $123,100
  • City of Henderson - $68,210
  • Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Kentucky - $305,561

Budget

See also: Kentucky state budget


Revenues

The General Fund budget is anticipating $23,485,000 in revenues. This is a $1,065,000 increase over the 2010 fiscal year because of a change in the property allocation. $5,775,000 of this revenue is expected to come from property taxes.[18]

Expenditures

In the 2010-11 budget year, general fund expenditures totaled $24,520,000, an increase of $2,060,000 over the 2009-10 budget year. Fifty-five percent or $1.142 million of the increase is due to transfers to the Civil Service Pension Fund, Police/Fire Pension Fund, and Bond Fund.[19]

Support for spending transparency

There is no information on support for spending transparency in Henderson.

Lobbying

See also: Kentucky government sector lobbying

Henderson is a member of the Kentucky Leaague of Cities, which is an organization that lobbies on behalf of Kentucky cities.[20]

Henderson is also a member of the National League of Cities, an organization that lobbies on behalf of cities on a national level.[21]

External links

References

  1. Wikipedia, "Henderson, Kentucky," accessed: April 20, 2011
  2. Budget
  3. Property tax
  4. Meetings
  5. Building permits
  6. Audits
  7. Elected officials
  8. Board of Commissioners
  9. Mayoral power
  10. Meetings
  11. Salaries
  12. Mayor and commissioner salaries
  13. City Employees
  14. City Employees
  15. Salaries
  16. Emergency personnel
  17. Stimulus spending
  18. Revenues
  19. Revenues
  20. Kentucky League of Cities
  21. [http://nlc.prod.bridgelinesw.net/member-center/MemberProfile?key=c7dccd9e-511f-4980-afb8-9843bf8a0c2d National League of Cities