Idaho elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Idaho held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate Defeatedd Preview Article
U.S. House (2 seats) Approveda
State Executives Defeatedd N/A
State Senate (35 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (70 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (4 measures) Approveda Preview Article

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

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See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2012
Members of the U.S. House from Idaho -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 0 0
     Republican Party 2 2
Total 2 2
District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
1st Democratic Party Jimmy Farris
Republican Party Raul Labrador
Libertarian Party Rob Oates
Independent Pro-Life
Raul Labrador Republican Party Raul Labrador No
2nd Democratic Party Nicole LeFavour
Republican Party Mike Simpson
Michael K. Simpson Republican Party Mike Simpson No

See also: Idaho State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintain partisan control in the state senate.

Idaho State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 7 6
     Republican Party 28 29
Total 35 35


See also: Idaho House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintain partisan control in the state house.

Idaho House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 13 13
     Republican Party 57 57
Total 70 70

See also: Idaho 2012 ballot measures
Type Title Subject Description Result
VR Proposition 1 Education One of three referenda that would repeal a newly passed law relating to education reform in the state. Defeatedd
VR Proposition 2 Education One of three referenda that would repeal a newly passed law relating to education reform in the state. Defeatedd
VR Proposition 3 Education One of three referenda that would repeal a newly passed law relating to education reform in the state. Defeatedd
LRCA HJR 2 Hunting Would add to the state constitution the right to hunt and fish. Approveda
LRCA SJR 102 Law enforcement State Board of Correction to have control, direction and management of felony probation and parole. Approveda

Eligibility to Vote

Idaho

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Idaho is one of 21 states to use a strictly closed primary system. Voters must have registered to vote in the primary by April 20, 2012, which was 25 days before the primary took place. A 2011 law passed by the legislature put closed primaries into place, but allowed for parties to opt to hold open primaries. In 2012, the Democratic Party held a semi-open primary, allowing unaffiliated voters the choice to vote in the Democratic Primary. However, the Republican Party kept its primary strictly closed.[1][2] (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote is 25 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 12.[3]

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

All voters are eligible to vote absentee in Idaho. There are no special eligibility requirements for voting absentee.[6]

Deadlines

To vote absentee, an absentee ballot application must be received by the election office at least six days prior to the election. A returned absentee ballot must then be received by the elections office by 8 p.m. on election day.[6]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Idaho is one of 34 states that has early voting with no specific requirements as to who can vote early. Early voting begins as soon as ballots become available and ends at 5 p.m. the Friday before election day.[7]

See also

References