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Indiana Tax Cap measure has three counterparts in Colorado

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May 25, 2010

INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana: Three measures in Colorado that are slated to be considered by voters are similar to a ballot proposal in Indiana that would add property tax caps to the Indiana Constitution. Amendment 60, one of the three measures, would cut school property tax rates in half by 2020 and would replace those cuts with state funds. Another measure would cut income and real estate taxes and decrease fees on auto registrations, while another would strictly limit borrowing in the state.[1]

According to Glenn Gustafson, chief financial officer for the Colorado Springs school system, who called the three Colorado measures the "evil triplets," the measures could lead to the shut down of prisons and the deterioration of schools and highways. Gustafson stated, "Are we really ready for the anarchy of an uneducated population that we can’t lock up in prison?."

In the Hoosier State, The Indianapolis Star wrote an editorial in favor of the tax cap measure and the effects that similar measures could have, writing, "Reining in spending should be a first order of business for all levels of government. But where government must be financed, far better that it be by way of a diverse source of taxes and fees accompanied by a diminished reliance on the property tax for local finance. Property tax caps will help facilitate that change."[2]

The Indiana statewide ballot measure was sent to the ballot after the Indiana House of Representatives approved the measure on January 11, 2010. The Indiana State Senate approved the measure on January 19, 2010 on at 35-15 vote.[3][4]

The Indiana Constitution is one of the most difficult in the country to amend, requiring that a proposed amendment be approved by two successive sessions of the Indiana State Legislature with an intervening election. The tax cap amendment was first passed through the 2008 session of the legislature.[5]

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