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Jeff Wasserburger

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Jeff Wasserburger
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Candidate for
Wyoming State Senate, District 23
PartyRepublican
Elections and appointments
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Personal
BirthdayJanuary 8, 1961
Place of birthLusk, Wyoming
ProfessionAssociate principal
CandidateVerification
Jeff Wasserburger is a 2014 Republican candidate for District 23 of the Wyoming State Senate.[1]

Issues

Campaign themes

2014

In statements printed by the Gillette News Record, Wasserburger highlighted the following campaign themes:

Coal

I believe that the future of Wyoming and coal is still very bright. Even with the recent stringent requirements placed on the industry by the EPA, coal is still the foundation of our nation’s energy supply of electricity.

Economic experts are still high on coal and its future. Coal companies will still need to grow and expand current operations by purchasing leases so they can continue to mine coal.

The state of Wyoming uses a system called Consensus Revenue Estimating Group (CREG) to predict how much money will be available for the next two years.

Since the budget for the state of Wyoming is already set for the next two years, the school capital construction needs have been met. I anticipate at the CREG meeting in 2016, the economic experts will have another surplus based on the current oil boom in Converse and Campbell counties.

Oil production and revenues to the state will increase substantially, along with trona, uranium and natural gas. Coal production and prices may be down, but will contribute significantly to the coffers of the state.

Therefore, I am confident that the revenue stream for school capital construction is viable for at least the next two years. Furthermore, the state of Wyoming has more than $11 billion in reserves that can be used temporarily to fund the building of schools until another revenue source is found.

If coal leases are not sold in the future, the Legislature anticipated this problem. The Legislature set up three separate funds that siphoned money from the School Foundation Fund, capping each fund at $100 million for future school capital facility needs.

Currently, the state is spending a little more than $200 million a year on new school construction. This stop-gap measure will fund school facilities for over one year into 2017.[2][3]

Common Core

The Legislature passed a law creating the powers and duties of the State Board of Education as a result of the Wyoming Supreme Court decision in Campbell I (1993). Currently, the Wyoming Legislature has delegated the power to adopt standards to the State Board of Education (SBE).

Several years ago, the Department of Education set state standards for our schools by holding meetings around our state asking input from parents, students, teachers and administrators on what our standards should be for our children.

I believe the standards that we set are better than the Common Core State Standards in math and science. My worry as a professional educator is that many of the CCSS are being pushed down to a younger age and that children are not mentally and physically developed to be successful.

As a middle school assistant principal, my teachers struggled with eighth-grade students to teach algebra. The Common Core requires that some algebra be taught at the sixth grade. My 14 years of experience leads me to believe that sixth-graders will struggle even more than eighth-graders to learn algebra and that test scores will lower significantly.

I simply believe that the Common Core State Standards will not work. CCSS pushes many standards down to a lower grade level. Students will struggle to learn. Test scores will lower significantly.

Currently, the SBE has adopted the Common Core for reading and writing. The SBE has not adopted Common Core Next Generation Standards for science and math.

In a side-by-side comparison of Wyoming’s standards in reading, writing, math and science to the Common Core, I think that the board made the correct decision. I support the State Board of Education’s decision. I believe that student achievement will be higher using the standards the SBE has adopted.[4][3]

Elections

2014

See also: Wyoming State Senate elections, 2014

Elections for the office of Wyoming State Senate will take place in 2014. A primary election took place on August 19, 2014. The general election will be held on November 4, 2014. The signature-filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was May 30, 2014. Jeff Wasserburger defeated Jeff Raney in the Republican primary. Wasserburger is unchallenged in the general election.[1]

Wyoming State Senate, District 23 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJeff Wasserburger 66.2% 2,007
Jeff Raney 33.8% 1,023
Total Votes 3,030

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References