June 11 congressional primary review: Only one incumbent lost, but it was a doozy

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June 11, 2014

By Ballotpedia's Congressional team


U.S. Senate

See also: United States Senate elections, 2014 and Contested primaries in U.S. Congressional elections, 2014

Maine

Maine
See also: United States Senate elections in Maine, 2014

Incumbent Susan Collins (R) and Shenna Bellows (D) ran unopposed in their respective primaries. They will face off, along with Independent candidate Erick Bennett, in the general election.

South Carolina

South Carolina
See also: United States Senate elections in South Carolina, 2014

Incumbent Lindsey Graham won the Republican primary. Graham will face Democrat Brad Hutto and Libertarian Victor Kocher in the general election. Hutto defeated Jay Stamper in the Democratic primary.[1]

U.S. Senate, South Carolina Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngLindsey Graham 58.4% 109,661
Lee Bright 13.9% 26,162
Richard Cash 8% 14,975
Det Bowers 7.2% 13,577
Nancy Mace 6.3% 11,752
Bill Connor 5.1% 9,611
Benjamin Dunn 1% 1,942
Total Votes 187,680
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.
U.S. Senate, South Carolina Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngBrad Hutto 76.6% 87,154
Jay Stamper 23.4% 26,579
Total Votes 113,733
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.


See also: United States Senate special election in South Carolina, 2014

Tim Scott easily defeated Randall Young in the Republican primary. Richland County Councilwoman Joyce Dickerson defeated former York County Councilman Sidney Moore and Harry Pavilack in the Democratic primary.[1] Scott and Dickerson will face Brandon Armstrong (I) and Jill Bossi, an American Party of South Carolina candidate, in the general election.


U.S. Senate, South Carolina Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTim Scott 90.2% 129,189
Randall Young 9.8% 14,003
Total Votes 143,192
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.
U.S. Senate, South Carolina Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJoyce Dickerson 65.4% 72,547
Sidney Moore 23.6% 26,191
Harry Pavilack 11% 12,214
Total Votes 110,952
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

Virginia

Virginia
See also: United States Senate elections in Virginia, 2014

On June 7, 2014, delegates met at the 2014 Republican State Convention to choose the Republican nominee for U.S. Senate to take on incumbent Mark Warner, who did not face a primary challenger.[2] Ed Gillespie, former Republican National Committee chairman and lobbyist, won the nomination. Gillespie was chosen by Republican delegates over senior policy advisor for Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, Anthony DeTora, veteran combat pilot Wayshak Hill and businessman Charles Moss. Gillespie led the Republican field in fundraising and has received contributions from the Bush family and help from Mitt Romney, but he still trails the well-funded Warner. Gillespie is, however, leading Warner among independents and Hispanics, according to Public Policy Polling, but Warner again leads Gillespie overall, 49 percent to 35 percent.[3] Gillespie and Warner will also face Libertarian Robert Sarvis, who ran an impressive campaign for governor of Virginia in 2013. Sarvis earned seven percent of the vote on election night, the best showing by a third-party candidate in the state since 1965.[4]

U.S. House

See also: United States House of Representatives elections, 2014 and Contested primaries in U.S. Congressional elections, 2014

Maine

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Maine, 2014

Two U.S. House seats are up for election in Maine. Democrats currently hold both seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Maine -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of August 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 2 Pending
     Republican Party 0 Pending
Total 2 2

District 1

See also: Maine's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Chellie Pingree (D) and Isaac Misiuk (R) ran unopposed in the primary elections. Independent candidate Richard Murphy will join them in the general election.

District 2

See also: Maine's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

On the Democratic ticket, state Senators Emily Cain and Troy Jackson went head to head for the nomination. Cain emerged victorious, defeating Troy Jackson 71 to 29 percent.[5]

Former state treasurer Bruce Poliquin defeated former state Senator Kevin Raye 57 percent to 43 percent in the Republican primary.[5]

Cain, Poliquin and Independent candidate Blaine Richardson will battle for the seat in the general election.

Richardson is the first non-major party nominee to be on the Maine general election ballot for U.S. House since 2006.[6]

Nevada

Nevada
See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada, 2014

There are four seats up for grabs in the Nevada's 2014 congressional elections. The Democratic Party and Republican Party each currently hold two seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Nevada -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of August 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 2 Pending
     Republican Party 2 Pending
Total 4 4

District 1

See also: Nevada's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Dina Titus defeated Herbert Peters in the Democratic primary. Annette Teijeiro beat out Jose Padilla for the Republican nomination.[7]

District 2

See also: Nevada's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Mark Amodei ran uncontested in the Republican primary. Kristen Spees defeated Vance Alm, Brian Dempsey and Ed Lee for the Democratic nomination.[7]

District 3

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: Nevada's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Nevada's 3rd Congressional District is a battleground district in 2014. However, the Cook Political Report and FairVote disagree on just how competitive this election will be. Cook's Partisan Voter Index (PVI) rates Nevada's 3rd District as evenly matched between Democratic and Republican voters.[8] FairVote, on the other hand, rates the district as 43.5% Democratic.[9] This could still make for a competitive race, but one that would most likely favor the Republican candidate. Republican incumbent Joe Heck has only been in office since 2011, but he won re-election in 2012 with a fairly safe 7.5% margin of victory. The district voted Democratic in the 2012 presidential election, but President Barack Obama won the district by a mere 0.8% margin of victory.

As of two weeks before the primary election, Democratic candidate Zachary Campbell did not appear to have any sort of website or to have done any significant advertising or fundraising. News articles simply referred to him as Bilbray-Kohn's "little-known opponent."[10] This left Erin Bilbray-Kohn as the most likely recipient of the Democratic nomination in the primary. Incumbent Joe Heck ran uncontested in the Republican primary, while Erin Bilbray-Kohn defeated Zachary Campbell for the Democratic nomination.[7]

For the general election, Heck maintains a lead in the general election polls, but Bilbray-Kohn contends that she will be able to close the gap.[11]

District 4

See also: Nevada's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Steven Horsford beat out Mark Budetich and Sid Zeller for the Democratic nomination in the primary. Cresent Hardy defeated Niger Innis, Mike Monroe and Carlo Poliak in the Republican primary.[7]

North Dakota

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in North Dakota, 2014

There is one seat up for grabs in North Dakota's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds North Dakota's only congressional seat.

Members of the U.S. House from North Dakota -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of August 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 0 Pending
     Republican Party 1 Pending
Total 1 1

At-Large District

See also: North Dakota's At-Large Congressional District elections, 2014

The were no contested races in North Dakota's primary. Incumbent Kevin Cramer ran uncontested for the Republican nomination, George B. Sinner ran uncontested for the Democratic nomination, and Jack Seaman ran uncontested for the Libertarian nomination.[12]

South Carolina

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 2014

There are seven seats up for grabs in South Carolina's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds six of South Carolina's seven congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from South Carolina -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of August 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 1 Pending
     Republican Party 6 Pending
Total 7 7

District 1

See also: South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Mark Sanford did not face a primary challenger and will not face a Democratic challenger in the general election. He will, however, meet Independent Dimitri Cherny in the general election. Despite an easy path to re-election in 2014, Sanford has not given any help to fellow Republicans Senator Lindsey Graham, who is the godfather of one of one of Sanford's sons, or Governor Nikki Haley. When asked if he would back them he said, "I'm focused on trying to be the best congressman that I can be for the 1st Congressional District. And that's it."[13]

District 2

See also: South Carolina's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Joe Wilson defeated Eddie McCain in the Republican primary. Wilson, who had a significant lead over McCain in fundraising, was expected to win the primary election. Phil Black defeated Ed Greenleaf by a small margin in the Democratic primary.[1] Black, who ran as a Republican in the 2010 and 2012 election for the 2nd Congressional District seat, was defeated by Wilson each time in the Republican primary.[14][15] Harold Geddings III, a Labor Party candidate, is also running.

U.S. House, South Carolina District 2 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJoe Wilson 81.6% 26,415
Eddie McCain 18.4% 5,947
Total Votes 32,362
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.
U.S. House, South Carolina District 2 Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngPhil Black 54.2% 6,613
Ed Greenleaf 45.8% 5,587
Total Votes 12,200
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 3

See also: South Carolina's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Barbara Jo Mullis defeated Hosea Cleveland in the Democratic primary. Mullis will face incumbent Jeff Duncan, who ran unopposed in the Republican primary, in the general election.[1]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 3 Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngBarbara Jo Mullis 67.1% 3,473
Hosea Cleveland 32.9% 1,705
Total Votes 5,178
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 4

See also: South Carolina's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Trey Gowdy did not face a challenger in the primary election. Gowdy will face Libertarian Curtis McLaughlin in the general election.

District 5

See also: South Carolina's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Mick Mulvaney (R) and Democrat Tom Adams did not face challengers in their primaries. The two will meet in the general election, along with Independent Robert McGee.

District 6

See also: South Carolina's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent James Clyburn, dean of South Carolina's congressional delegation and the first black elected to Congress from South Carolina since Reconstruction, defeated Karen Smith in the Democratic primary. Anthony Culler defeated Dr. Leon Winn, a preacher and first vice-chairman of the Sumter County Republican Party in Sumter, S.C., in the Republican primary. Clyburn and Culler will face Libertarian and retired U.S. Air Force Officer Kevin Umbaugh in the general election.[1]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 6 Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJim Clyburn 85.8% 28,649
Karen Smith 14.2% 4,737
Total Votes 33,386
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.
U.S. House, South Carolina District 6 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAnthony Culler 64.5% 7,313
Leon Winn 35.5% 4,027
Total Votes 11,340
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 7

See also: South Carolina's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Tom Rice and Democratic challenger Gloria Bromell Tinubu will meet again in the general election. Neither candidate faced a primary challenger. Bromell Tinubu was defeated by Rice in the November 6, 2012, general election.[16]

Virginia

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2014

There are 11 seats up for grabs in Virginia's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds eight of Virginia's eleven congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Virginia -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of August 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 3 Pending
     Republican Party 8 Pending
Total 11 11

District 1

See also: Virginia's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Robert J. Wittman defeated public relations specialist Anthony Riedel in the June 10, 2014, primary election. Wittman will face Libertarian Lieutenant Colonel Xavian Draper in the general election.

U.S. House, Virginia District 1 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRob Wittman 78.1% 9,713
Anthony Riedel 21.9% 2,727
Total Votes 12,440
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 2

See also: Virginia's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014
BattlegroundRace.jpg

Incumbent Scott Rigell will face retired U.S. Navy Reserve Commander Suzanne Patrick and Libertarian Allen Knapp in the general election. Rigell and Patrick did not face primary challengers. The Republican and Democratic parties have provided Rigell and Patrick with additional support for the upcoming election. Rigell is a member of the National Republican Congressional Committee's Patriot Program. The program is designed to assist vulnerable Republican incumbents heading into the 2014 election.[17] Patrick is a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's Jumpstart program, which is designed to provide early support to top-tier Democratic challengers.[18] Ballotpedia has identified Virginia's 2nd Congressional District as a battleground race because Cook's PVI shows the district as R+2, and Fairvote rates the district as 43.4% Democratic. In addition, President Barack Obama won the district by 1.5% in 2012 and 1.7% in 2008.

District 3

See also: Virginia's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Bobby Scott did not face a primary challenger. He will face Libertarian Justin Upshaw and Independent Justin Gandino-Saadein in the general election.

District 4

See also: Virginia's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Randy Forbes did not face a primary challenger. He will face Libertarian Bo Brown in the general election.

District 5

See also: Virginia's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Robert Hurt won the Republican nomination on May 22, 2014.[19] He will face Lawrence Gaughan, who defeated Ben Hudson at the Democratic Convention on May 31, 2014, Libertarian Paul Jones and Green Party candidate Kenneth Hildebrandt in the general election.[20]

District 6

See also: Virginia's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Bob Goodlatte did not face a primary challenger. He will face Independent Paul Bevington, who failed to file as a Republican candidate, and Libertarian Will Hammer in the general election.[21][22]

District 7

See also: Virginia's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

David Brat defeated incumbent Eric Cantor, the second-highest ranking Republican in the House, in the Republican primary.[23] Brat, an economics professor at Randolph-Macon College, will face Democrat Jack Trammell, who is also a professor at Randolph-Macon, Libertarian James Carr and write-in candidate Mike Dickinson, who failed to earn the Democratic endorsement. Stuart Rothenberg, who publishes the Rothenberg Political Report, commented on Brat's victory, saying, "This is the political version of the San Francisco earthquake. It came out of nowhere."[24] The Rothenberg Political Report/Roll Call rated Virginia’s 7th District as “Safe Republican.”[25]

U.S. House, Virginia District 7 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDavid Brat 55.5% 36,110
Eric Cantor Incumbent 44.5% 28,898
Total Votes 65,008
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 8

See also: Virginia's 8th Congressional District elections, 2014

Former Lieutenant Governor Don Beyer emerged as the clear winner in a crowded Democratic primary.[1] Beyer will face Republican Micah Edmond in the general election for a chance to win Jim Moran’s (D) seat in the House. Moran, who was first elected in 1990, is not seeking re-election. Edmond defeated Dennis Bartow and Paul Haring at the 8th Congressional District Virginia Republican Convention on April 26, 2014.[26]

According to the Washington Post, Beyer has called on Howard Dean, Anita Dunn, who is his campaign consultant, and “other prominent former Obama hands like Pete Rouse, Julianna Smoot and Mitch Stewart” to help him on the campaign trail.[27] Beyer, who has more name recognition, establishment ties and money, is expected to win in this heavily Democratic district where Obama won more than two out of three votes in 2012.[27]

U.S. House, Virginia District 8 Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDon Beyer 45.4% 16,737
Patrick Hope 18.4% 6,809
Adam Ebbin 13.9% 5,120
William Euille 8.4% 3,107
Mark Levine 6.7% 2,474
Lavern Chatman 5.3% 1,968
Derek Hyra 1.3% 465
Charniele Herring 0.3% 116
Bruce Shuttleworth 0.2% 80
Satish Korpe 0.1% 30
Total Votes 36,906
Source: Results via Associated Press Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

District 9

See also: Virginia's 9th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Morgan Griffith did not face a primary challenger. He will face Libertarian Matthew Edwards in the general election.

District 10

See also: Virginia's 10th Congressional District elections, 2014

Virginia state delegate, Barbara Comstock, won the Republican nomination in the firehouse primary on April 26, 2014, and will face Fairfax County Supervisor John Foust (D) and Bill Redpath (L) for retiring Republican congressman Frank Wolf's long-held seat. The Washington Post ranked Virginia's 10th Congressional District seat as the sixth most likely seat to flip control in the 2014 election.[28]

U.S. House, Virginia District 10 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngBarbara Comstock 53.9% 7,337
Bob Marshall 28.1% 3,829
Howie Lind 8.1% 1,108
Stephen Hollingshead 6% 816
Rob Wasinger 2.2% 301
Mark Savitt 1.6% 218
Total Votes 13,609
Source: VAGOP10.org, "Recapping the 2014 Party Canvass," accessed July 1, 2014

District 11

See also: Virginia's 11th Congressional District elections, 2014

Delegates at Virginia’s 11th Congressional District Republican Convention selected Suzanne Scholte as the Republican nominee for the 11th District to take on incumbent Gerry Connolly (D), who did not face a primary challenger.[19] Connolly and Scholte will face off with Green Party candidate Joe Galdo, Libertarian Marc Harrold and Independent Mark Gibson in the general election.

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Associated Press, "South Carolina - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 10, 2014
  2. RPV.org, "2014 Republican State Convention Tentative Agenda," accessed May 30, 2014
  3. Washington Examiner, "Surprise: Ed Gillespie beating Mark Warner among independents, Hispanics," accessed June 3, 2014
  4. New York Daily News, "Terry McAuliffe wins bitter Virginia governor race against Republican Ken Cuccinelli," November 6, 2013
  5. 5.0 5.1 Washington Post, "Results: Primary elections, June 10," accessed June 10, 2014
  6. Ballot Access, "Independent for U.S. House Qualifies in Maine, for First Time Since 2006," accessed June 3, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Associated Press, "Nevada House - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 10, 2014
  8. The Cook Political Report, "Partisan Voting Index, Districts of the 113th Congress," accessed May 27, 2014
  9. FairVote, "2014 Elections in Nevada," accessed May 27, 2014
  10. Las Vegas Review Journal, "Similar registration makes 3rd Congressional District race state’s most competitive," accessed May 27, 2014
  11. Las Vegas Review Journal, "Bilbray poll contends House race ‘wide open’," accessed May 27, 2014
  12. Associated Press, "North Dakota House - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 10, 2014
  13. Post and Courier, "One year later: Mark Sanford talks about his first year back in Congress," accessed June 4, 2014
  14. South Carolina State Election Commission, "Official 2012 Primary Results"
  15. National Journal, "South Carolina District 2," accessed April 10, 2012
  16. Associated Press, "2012 Primary Results"
  17. Roll Call, "House GOP adds 9 vulnerable incumbents to Patriot Program," July 21, 2013
  18. The Washington Post, "DCCC adds nine names to program for top recruits," September 9, 2013
  19. 19.0 19.1 FaquierGOP.com, "Rep. Robert Hurt Unopposed For Republican 5th District Nomination," accessed June 1, 2014
  20. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named win
  21. Virginia State Board of Elections, "Primary Nominees," accessed April 3, 2014
  22. Virginia Conservative, "Bevington Still In Race, Picks Up Endorsement," accessed April 5, 2014
  23. Associated Press, "Virginia - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 10, 2014
  24. La Times, "Washington reels as House's Eric Cantor loses to tea party challenger," accessed June 10, 2014
  25. Roll Call, “Eric Cantor Brings in Bucks for Primary Challenge,” accessed June 2, 2014
  26. VAGOP8CD.org, "8th Congressional District Virginia Republican Convention," accessed April 30, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 The Washington Post, "In Va.’s 8th District, reconciling past and future," accessed June 3, 2014
  28. The Washington Post, "The Fix’s top 10 open seat House races of 2014," January 17, 2014