June 3 congressional primaries: Mississippi runoffs, tight races in California and a notable Iowa victory

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June 4, 2014

By Ballotpedia's Congressional team
Yesterday's primary election lived up to the hype surrounding what many referred to as the "Summer Super Tuesday" of the midterm season. As of the morning of June 4, 2014, Sen. Thad Cochran is expected be involved in the first primary runoff election of his career against tea party favorite Chris McDaniel. Among one of the first races called for the night was the crowded Republican primary for U.S. Senate from Iowa; State Sen. Joni Ernst hurdled across the required 35 percent threshold needed to avoid a runoff. A handful of U.S. House races in California remained too close to call as of Wednesday morning.

U.S. Senate

See also: United States Senate elections, 2014 and Contested primaries in U.S. Congressional elections, 2014

Alabama

Alabama
See also: United States Senate elections in Alabama, 2014

No primaries took place for Alabama's U.S. Senate seat. Incumbent Jeff Sessions (R) sought re-election unopposed in the Republican primary, and the Democratic Party failed to produce a candidate to challenge him. This election marks the first time in Alabama history that the Democratic Party has fielded no candidates for the state's U.S. Senate race.[1]

Iowa

Iowa
See also: United States Senate elections in Iowa, 2014

The election will fill the Senate seat currently held by Tom Harkin (D). Harkin was first elected in 1984. On January 26, 2013, Harkin announced that he would not seek re-election once his current term expires. Upon his retirement, he will have served in the U.S. Senate for 30 years. Prior to this, he served in the U.S. House for ten years. He said of his retirement, "I have mixed feelings. You know what, it's somebody else's turn. To walk away from this position and this power is not an easy thing. But I think it's the right thing."[2]

A crowded field of candidates ran on the Republican ticket for the open seat. State senator Joni Ernst beat out former U.S. attorney Matt Whitaker, conservative radio show host Sam Clovis, businessman Scott Schaben and former oil executive Mark Jacobs are all vying for the nomination.

The establishment and tea party wings of the Republican party both rallied behind Ernst prior to the primary election.[3] She received the backing of an array of national GOP groups and individuals, including The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, The National Rifle Association, Sen. Marco Rubio, Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney, Republican activist David Oman and Iowa Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11] Ernst also maintained a lead in polling and campaign contributions.

Rep. Bruce Braley ran unopposed in the Democratic primary.[12][13]

U.S. Senate, Iowa Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJoni Ernst 56.2% 88,535
Sam Clovis 18% 28,418
Mark Jacobs 16.8% 26,523
Matt Whitaker 7.5% 11,884
Scott Schaben 1.4% 2,233
Total Votes 157,593
Source: Iowa Secretary of State

Mississippi

Mississippi
See also: United States Senate elections in Mississippi, 2014

Leading up to the primary, incumbent Thad Cochran maintained an advantage over challenger Chris McDaniel in the polls and campaign finances, but McDaniel finished with more votes in the actual primary. Cochran and McDaniel faced a tight race, and although McDaniel had a slight lead, he finished short of the 50% of votes necessary to avoid a runoff, so Cochran and McDaniel will face off again on June 24, 2014.[14][15] Cochran and McDaniel both beat Thomas Carey by a wide margin.

Travis Childers easily defeated Bill Marcy, William Bond Compton, Jr. and Jonathan Rawl for the Democratic nomination in the primary.[16] Childers was the definitive front-runner in the Democratic primary, having raised $51,600 in the April Quarterly FEC report and leading in the polls.[17][18][19]

U.S. Senate, Mississippi Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngChris McDaniel 49.5% 157,733
Green check mark transparent.pngThad Cochran Incumbent 49% 156,315
Thomas Carey 1.5% 4,854
Total Votes 318,902
Source: Mississippi Secretary of State - Official Republican primary results
U.S. Senate, Mississippi Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTravis Childers 74% 63,548
Bill Marcy 12.1% 10,361
William Bond Compton, Jr. 9.9% 8,465
Jonathan Rawl 4.1% 3,492
Total Votes 85,866
Source: Mississippi Secretary of State - Official Democratic primary results

Montana

Montana
See also: United States Senate elections in Montana, 2014

Incumbent John Walsh defeated John Bohlinger and Dirk Adams in the Democratic primary. Walsh has raised significantly more in campaign contributions than either of the other candidates. In the Republican primary, Steve Daines beat out Champ Edmunds and Susan Cundiff for the nomination.[20] Daines had fundraised and advertised far more than any other Republican candidate.[21][22]

U.S. Senate, Montana Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSteve Daines 83.4% 110,565
Susan Cundiff 9% 11,909
Champ Edmunds 7.7% 10,151
Total Votes 132,625
Source: Montana Secretary of State - Official Primary Results
U.S. Senate, Montana Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Walsh Incumbent 64% 48,665
John Bohlinger 22.6% 17,187
Dirk Adams 13.3% 10,139
Total Votes 75,991
Source: Montana Secretary of State - Official Primary Results

New Jersey

New Jersey
See also: United States Senate elections in New Jersey, 2014

Democratic incumbent Cory Booker ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination in the primary. Jeff Bell defeated candidates Brian Goldberg, Rich Pezzullo and Murray Sabrin for the nomination in the Republican primary.[23][24]

U.S. Senate, New Jersey Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJeff Bell 29.4% 42,728
Rich Pezzullo 26.2% 38,130
Brian Goldberg 25% 36,266
Murray Sabrin 19.4% 28,183
Total Votes 145,307
Source: New Jersey Division of Elections - Official Election Results

New Mexico

New Mexico
See also: United States Senate elections in New Mexico, 2014

Tom Udall, the current incumbent, ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Republican candidate Allen Weh defeated David Clements in the primary to earn the chance to compete against Udall in the general election in November.[25] Despite a tight pre-primary convention, Weh took 63% of the votes with 61% of precincts reported.[25][26] Nonetheless, the 71-year-old Weh will not have very high odds of defeating Udall in the general election.[27]

U.S. Senate, New Mexico Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAllen Weh 63% 41,566
David Clements 37% 24,413
Total Votes 65,979
Source: New Mexico Secretary of State - Official Primary Results

South Dakota

South Dakota
See also: United States Senate elections in South Dakota, 2014

Former South Dakota Republican governor Mike Rounds won the Republican nomination in the primary on June 3, 2014. He easily defeated his challengers.[28] Rounds will face Rick Weiland, who ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, former Rep. and Senator Larry Pressler (I) and former South Dakota State Senator Gordon Howie (I) in the general election.

After, former Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D) declined to run, Republicans have seen South Dakota’s race as their best chance to pick up a seat in the Senate. A Republican strategist said, "Despite being a Democrat, she's well-liked in the state. She's still got really strong numbers. That would have been a legitimate battle with Rounds. She still would still have the same uphill sledding in a tough environment, but she would have made Rounds really work for the seat."[29] Without a significant challenger like Herseth Sandlin, Rounds has a strong chance to defeat Weiland in the general election. The Rothenberg Political Report/ Roll Call rated this race as “Republican Favored.”[30] If Rounds wins it will be the first time in 28 years both South Dakota U.S. Senate seats are held by Republicans.[31]

U.S. Senate, South Dakota Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMike Rounds 55.5% 41,372
Stace Nelson 18.2% 13,591
Larry Rhoden 17.7% 13,178
Annette Bosworth 5.7% 4,283
Jason Ravnsborg 2.8% 2,066
Total Votes 74,490
Source: Results via Associated Press

U.S. House

See also: United States House of Representatives elections, 2014 and Contested primaries in U.S. Congressional elections, 2014

Alabama

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2014

Seven U.S. House seats are up for election in Alabama. Republicans currently hold six of the seven seats, and that is very unlikely to change as none of the districts are competitive in 2014.

Members of the U.S. House from Alabama -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 1 Pending
     Republican Party 6 Pending
Total 7 7

District 1

See also: Alabama's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Bradley Byrne (R), who was first elected in a special election in 2013. He faced no challenger in the primary election. Democratic candidate Burton LeFlore also faced no opposition in the primary election.[32][33]

District 2

See also: Alabama's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Martha Roby (R), who was first elected in 2010. She faced no challenger in the primary election. Democratic candidate Erick Wright also ran unopposed in the primary.[32][33]

District 3

See also: Alabama's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Mike Rogers (R), who was first elected in 2002. He defeated Thomas Casson in the primary election. Jesse Smith ran unopposed in the Democratic primary.[32][33][34]

District 4

See also: Alabama's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Robert Aderholt (R), who was first elected in 1996. He faced no opposition in the primary election and will face no challenger in the general election either.[32][33]

District 5

See also: Alabama's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Mo Brooks (R), who was first elected in 2010. He defeated Jerry Hill in the primary election.[34] Brooks will run unopposed in the general election.[32][33]

District 6

See also: Alabama's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Seven Republican candidates competed in the primary to fill the seat left by the retirement of incumbent Spencer Bachus: Chad Mathis, Paul DeMarco, Will Brooke, Gary Palmer, Tom Vigneulle, Robert Shattuck and Scott Beason. Of those seven, Paul DeMarco and Gary Palmer advanced to the primary runoff election. On the Democratic ticket, Avery Vise ran unopposed.[34][32][33]

District 7

See also: Alabama's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Terri Sewell (D), who was first elected in 2010. She defeated Tamara Harris Johnson in the primary election.[34] Sewell will face no Republican opponent in November.[32][33]

California

California
See also: United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2014

California has 53 seats up for grabs in the U.S. House. The Democratic Party currently holds 38 of those seats and the Republican Party controls the remaining 15. Due to California's blanket primary system, the two candidates who receive the most votes advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation.

As of Wednesday morning, eight U.S. House races remain too close to call for one or more candidates: District 4, District 5, District 15, District 24, District 31, District 33, District 34 and District 46.[35]

Members of the U.S. House from California -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 38 Pending
     Republican Party 15 Pending
Total 53 53

District 1

See also: California's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Doug LaMalfa (R), who was first elected in 2012. He and Heidi Hall (D) advanced past the primary, defeating Gregory Cheadle (R) and Dan Levine (D).[36][35]

District 2

See also: California's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Jared Huffman (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Dale Mensing (R) defeated Andy Caffrey (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 3

See also: California's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is John Garamendi (D), who was first elected in 2008. He and Dan Logue (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 4

See also: California's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Tom McClintock (R), who was first elected in 2008. McClintock advanced past the primary, but the race between Art Moore and Jeffrey Gerlach remains too close to call.[36][35]

District 5

See also: California's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Mike Thompson (D), who was first elected in 1998. Thompson advanced past the primary, but the race between James Hinton (I) and Doug Van Raam (I) remains too close to call.[36][35]

District 6

See also: California's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Doris Matsui (D), who was first elected in 2004. She and Joseph McCray, Sr. (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 7

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: California's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Ami Bera (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Doug Ose (R) advanced past the primary, defeating Igor Birman (R), Elizabeth Emken (R), Douglas Arthur Tuma (L) and Phill Tufi (I).[36][35]

California's 7th Congressional District is a battleground in 2014.[37] Cook's PVI shows the district as even, while Fairvote shows the district slightly favoring the Democratic Party.[38][39] The incumbent won election in 2012 by only 3.4 percent, and the district was won by President Barack Obama by 5 percent or less in both 2008 and 2012. Additionally, incumbent Ami Bera is a freshman representative.

Bera would have likely preferred to face Igor Birman in the general election, who is seen as being more conservative than Doug Ose, who has a reputation of being more moderate. This is due to the fact that the district is evenly split between Democrats and Republicans, meaning that the Independent and third-party vote could be a very real factor in determining the winner.

District 8

See also: California's 8th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Paul Cook (R), who was first elected in 2006. He and Bob Conaway (D) advanced past the primary, defeating Paul Hannosh (R) and Odessia Lee (D).[36][35]

District 9

See also: California's 9th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Jerry McNerney (D), who was first elected in 2006. He and Tony Amador (R) defeated Steve Colangelo (R) and Karen Mathews Davis (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 10

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: California's 10th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Jeff Denham (R), who was first elected in 2010. He and Michael Eggman (D) defeated Mike Barkley (D) in the primary.[36][35]

Our analysis points to California's 10th Congressional District being a battleground with a slight Republican lean. Cook's PVI shows the district as R+1, while Fairvote rates the district as 56.6% Republican.[40][41] Incumbent Jeff Denham won election by just over 5 percent in 2012, but the district was won by President Barack Obama by 3.6% in 2012 and 3% in 2008. Additionally, Denham is a sophomore representative with only one prior term under his belt.

District 11

See also: California's 11th Congressional District elections, 2014

Six candidates competed in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of Democratic incumbent George Miller: Tony Daysog (D), Mark DeSaulnier (D), Ki Ingersol (D), Cheryl Sudduth, (D) Tue Phan-Quang (R) and Jason Ramey (I). DeSaulnier and Phan-Quang were victorious in the primary and will face off in November.[36][35]

District 12

See also: California's 12th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Nancy Pelosi (D), who was first elected in 1986. She and John Dennis (R) defeated David Peterson (R), Michael Steger (D), Barry Hermanson (G), Frank Lara (P&F), Desmond Thorsson (I) and Jim Welles (I) in the primary.[36][35]

District 13

See also: California's 13th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Barbara Lee (D), who was first elected in 1998. She and Dakin Sundeen (R) defeated Justin Jelincic (D) and Lawrence Allen (P&F) in the primary.[36][35]

District 14

See also: California's 14th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Jackie Speier (D), who was first elected in 2008. She and Robin Chew (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 15

See also: California's 15th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Eric Swalwell (D), who was first elected in 2012. Swalwell advanced past the primary, however, the race between Ellen Corbett (D) and Hugh Bussell (R) remains too close to call.[36][35]

District 16

See also: California's 16th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Jim Costa (D), who was first elected in 2004. He and Johnny Tacherra (R) defeated Job Melton (D), Joanna Botelho (R), Steve Crass (R) and Mel Levey (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 17

See also: California's 17th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Mike Honda (D), who was first elected in 2000. He and Ro Khanna (D) defeated Vanila Singh (R) and Joel Vanlandingham (R) in the primary.[36][35]

California's 17th District primary between Honda and Khanna made an August 2013 list of five primaries to watch in 2014 published by Politico.[42]

District 18

See also: California's 18th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Anna Eshoo (D), who was first elected in 1992. She and Richard Fox (R) defeated Bruce Anderson (R) and Oscar Alejandro Braun (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 19

See also: California's 19th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Zoe Lofgren (D), who was first elected in 1994. She and Robert Murray (D) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 20

See also: California's 20th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Sam Farr (D), who was first elected in 1992. He and Ronald Paul Kabat (I) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 21

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: California's 21st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is David Valadao (R), who was first elected in 2012. He and Amanda Renteria (D) defeated John Hernandez (D) in the primary.[36][35]

Our analysis points to California's 21st Congressional District being a battleground with a current Republican incumbent that leans Democratic. Cook's PVI shows the district as D+2, while Fairvote rates the district as 50.9% Democratic.[43][44] The district was also won by President Barack Obama by 11.1% in 2012 and 6% in 2008. Additionally, incumbent David Valadao is a freshman representative.

District 22

See also: California's 22nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Devin Nunes (R), who was first elected in 2002. He and Suzanna Aguilera-Marrero (D) defeated John Catano (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 23

See also: California's 23rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Kevin McCarthy (R), who was first elected in 2006. He faced no opposition in the primary and remains unopposed in the general election.[36][35]

District 24

See also: California's 24th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Lois Capps (D), who was first elected in 1998. Capps advanced past the primary, but the race between Chris Mitchum (R) and Justin Fareed (R) remains too close to call. Paul Coyne, Jr. (D), Sandra Marshall (D), Bradley Allen (R), Dale Francisco (R), Alexis Stuart (R) and Steve Isakson (I) were defeated in the primary.[36][35]

District 25

See also: California's 25th Congressional District elections, 2014

Eight candidates competed in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of Republican incumbent Buck McKeon: Lee Rogers (D), Evan Thomas (D), Troy Castagna (R), Stephen Knight (R), Navraj Singh (R), Tony Strickland, (R) David Bruce (L) and Michael Mussack (I). Tony Strickland and Steve Knight advanced past the primary and will face off in November.[36][35]

District 26

See also: California's 26th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Julia Brownley (D), who was first elected in 2012. She and Jeff Gorell (R) defeated Rafael Dagnesses (R) and Douglas Kmiec (I) in the primary.[36][35]

District 27

See also: California's 27th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Judy Chu (D), who was first elected in 2008. She and Jack Orswell (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 28

See also: California's 28th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Adam Schiff (D), who was first elected in 2000. He and Steve Stokes (I) defeated Sal Genovese (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 29

See also: California's 29th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Tony Cardenas (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and William O'Callaghan Leader (R) defeated Venice Gamble (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 30

See also: California's 30th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Brad Sherman (D), who was first elected in 1996. He and Mark Reed (R) defeated Marc Litchman (D), Pablo Kleinman (R), and Mike Powelson (G) in the primary.[36][35]

District 31

See also: California's 31st Congressional District elections, 2014

Seven candidates competed in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of Republican incumbent Gary Miller: Pete Aguilar (D), Joe Baca (D), Danny Tillman (D), Eloise Gomez Reyes (D), Lesli Gooch (R), Paul Chabot (R) and Ryan Downing (R). Paul Chabot advanced past the primary, but the race between Pete Aguilar, Lesli Gooch, and Eloise Gomez Reyes remains too close to call.[36][35]

Miller was able to win re-election in the Democratic leaning district in 2012, due to four Democratic candidates splitting the primary vote enough so that the two Republican candidates advanced past the primary. The same could potentially happen in 2014, as Pete Aguilar (D) barely leads Lesli Gooch (R) as of Wednesday morning.

District 32

See also: California's 32nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Grace Napolitano (D), who was first elected in 1998. She and Art Alas (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 33

See also: California's 33rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Sixteen candidates competed in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of Democratic incumbent Henry Waxman: Vince Flaherty (D), Wendy Greuel (D), Kristie Holmes (D), David Kanuth (D), Ted Lieu (D), Matt Miller (D), Barbara Mulvaney (D), Zein Obagi (D), Michael Shapiro (D), Elan Carr (R), Lily Gilani (R), Kevin Mottus (R), Mark Matthew Herd (L), Michael Ian Sachs (G), Tom Fox (I) and Marianne Williamson (I).[36]

As of Wednesday morning, no candidate has been called as winning the race. Elan Carr leads the field with 21.5% of the vote, while Ted Lieu has 19%. Wendy Greuel and Marianne Williamson trail in 3rd and 4th place with 16.8% and 12% of the vote, respectively.[35]

District 34

See also: California's 34th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Xavier Becerra (D), who was first elected in 1992. Becerra advanced past the primary. However, the race between Adrienne Nicole Edwards (D) and Howard Johnson (P&F) remains too close to call.[36][35]

District 35

See also: California's 35th Congressional District elections, 2014

Four Democratic competed in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of incumbent Gloria Negrete McLeod: Christina Gagnier, Scott Heydenfeldt, Norma Torres and Anthony Vieyra. Torres and Gagnier advanced past the primary, defeating McLeod and Heydenfeldt.[36][35]

District 36

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: California's 36th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Raul Ruiz (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Brian Nestande (R) defeated Ray Haynes (R) in the primary and will face off in November.[36][35]

Our analysis points to California's 36th Congressional District being a battleground The district has very close to even numbers of Democratic and Republican voters. Cook's PVI shows the district as R+1, while Fairvote rates the district as 51.2% Democratic.[45][46] The district was won by President Barack Obama by 3.2% in 2012 and 3% in 2008. Additionally, incumbent Raul Ruiz is a freshman representative.

District 37

See also: California's 37th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Karen Bass (D), who was first elected in 2010. She and Adam King (R) defeated Mervin Evans (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 38

See also: California's 38th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Linda Sanchez (D), who was first elected in 2002. She and Benjamin Campos (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 39

See also: California's 39th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Edward Royce (R), who was first elected in 1992. He and Peter Anderson (D) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 40

See also: California's 40th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Lucille Roybal-Allard (D), who was first elected in 1992. She and David Sanchez (D) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 41

See also: California's 41st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Mark Takano (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Steve Adams (R) defeated Veronica Franco (D) and Yvonne Terrell Girard (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 42

See also: California's 42nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Ken Calvert (R), who was first elected in 1992. He and Tim Sheridan (D) defeated Kerri Condley (D) and Chris Marquez (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 43

See also: California's 43rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Maxine Waters (D), who was first elected in 1990. She and John Wood (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 44

See also: California's 44th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Janice Hahn (D), who was first elected in 2010. She is running completely unopposed in both the primary and general election.[36][35]

District 45

See also: California's 45th Congressional District elections, 2014

Four candidates are competing in the race to fill the open seat left by the retirement of Republican incumbent John Campbell: Drew Leavens (D), Greg Raths (R), Mimi Walters (R) and Al Salehi (I). Walters and Leavens advanced past the primary, defeating Raths and Salehi. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 46

See also: California's 46th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Loretta Sanchez (D), who was first elected in 1996. She advanced past the primary. However, the race between John Cullum (R) and Adam Nick (R) remains too close to call.[36][35]

District 47

See also: California's 47th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Alan Lowenthal (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Andy Whallon (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 48

See also: California's 48th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Dana Rohrabacher (R), who was first elected in 1988. He and Sue Savary (D) defeated Wendy Leece (R), Robert John Banuelos (D) and David Burns (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 49

See also: California's 49th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Darrell Issa (R), who was first elected in 2000. He and Dave Peiser (D) defeated Noboru Isagawa (D) in the primary.[36][35]

District 50

See also: California's 50th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Duncan Hunter (R), who was first elected in 2008. He and James Kimber (D) defeated Michael Benoit (L) in the primary.[36][35]

District 51

See also: California's 51st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Juan Vargas (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Stephen Meade (R) ran unopposed in the blanket primary. They will face off in November.[36][35]

District 52

See also: California's 52nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Scott Peters (D), who was first elected in 2012. He and Carl DeMaio (R) defeated Kirk Jorgensen (R) and Fred Simon (R) in the primary.[36][35]

District 53

See also: California's 53rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Susan Davis (D), who was first elected in 2000. She and Larry Wilske (R) defeated John Edwards (R), Joel Marchese (R), Jim Stieringer (R), Wayne True (R), Christina Bobb (I) and John Campbell (I) in the primary.[36][35]

Iowa

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Iowa, 2014

There are four seats up for grabs in Iowa's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds two of Iowa's four congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Iowa -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 2 Pending
     Republican Party 2 Pending
Total 4 4

District 1

See also: Iowa's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Bruce Braley (D), who was first elected in 2006. Braley is not seeking re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. He is running for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Tom Harkin.[47]

On the Democratic ticket, state Reps. Pat Murphy beat out Anesa Kajtazovic, attorney Dave O'Brien, Cedar Rapids City Council member Monica Vernon, former state Senator and Iowa Utilities Board member Swati Dandekar for the nomination to succeed Democratic incumbent Bruce Braley.[48]

In the Republican primary, 2012 candidate Rod Blum defeated 2010 candidate Steve Rathje and Gail Boliver for the nomination.[48]

In polls, Pat Murphy (D) and Rod Blum (R) were the front-runners heading into the primary.

District 2

See also: Iowa's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Dave Loebsack (D), who was first elected in 2006. He faced no opposition in the Democratic primary.

Former Iowa Department of Public Health director Mariannette Miller-Meeks beat out state Representative Mark S. Lofgren and Matthew Waldren for the nomination in the Republican primary.[49][48]

In a single poll conducted in the district prior to the primary, Mariannette Miller-Meeks was the frontrunner.

District 3

See also: Iowa's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Democratic incumbent Leonard Boswell was unseated by Tom Latham (R) in the 2012 general election, but President Obama still won the district, signaling to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee that the 3rd District could be reclaimed in 2014.

Tom Latham announced on December 17, 2013, that he would not run for re-election in 2014, leaving the seat open.[50]

A single Democratic candidate ran in the primary--Staci Appel.[49]

On the Republican ticket, six candidates are seeking the nomination--Iowa Secretary of State Matt Schultz, Joe Grandanette, former chief of staff to Sen. Chuck Grassley David Young, state Senator Brad Zaun, Robert Cramer and Monte Shaw.[49][48]

The Republican nomination will be decided by a convention after none of the six candidates reached the 35 percent threshold required to make the general election ballot.[51]

District 4

See also: Iowa's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Steve King (R), who was first elected in 2002. He faced no challenger in the primary election. Democratic candidate Jim Mowrer also faced no opposition in the primary election.

Mowrer received backing from national Democratic figures. John Delaney (D-MD) made a visit to Iowa on September 5, 2013, on behalf of Democratic candidate Jim Mowrer.[52]

Vice President Joe Biden attended a fundraiser for Iowa Democratic candidate Jim Mowrer on September 24, 2013.[53] The event was hosted at the Washington, D.C. townhouse of April and John Delaney (D-MD).[53] The event was also one of the only fundraisers that Biden planned to do in 2014 for an individual congressional candidate.[53] U.S. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD) was also in attendance.[53]

Mowrer will attempt to unseat King in the general election.

Mississippi

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi, 2014

There are four seats up for grabs in Mississippi's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds three of Mississippi's four congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Mississippi -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 1 Pending
     Republican Party 3 Pending
Total 4 4

District 1

See also: Mississippi's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Alan Nunnelee ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Ron Dickey defeated Rex Weathers for the Democratic nomination.[16][54]

District 2

See also: Mississippi's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Bennie Thompson beat out Damien Fairconetue for the Democratic nomination in the primary. No Republican candidates ran in Mississippi's 2nd District, but Troy Ray will run in the general election as an independent candidate and Shelley Shoemake will run from the Reform Party.[16][54]

District 3

See also: Mississippi's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Gregg Harper defeated Hardy Caraway in the Republican primary. Neither Doug Magee nor Dennis Quinn received the 50% of votes to win the primary election, so they will go on to battle for the Democratic nomination in a runoff primary on June 24, 2014.[55] Both Magee and Quinn beat Jim Liljeberg in the primary. Also running in the general election will be independent candidate Roger Gerrard and Reform Party candidate Barbara Dale Washer.[16][54]

District 4

See also: Mississippi's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

The Republican primary in Mississippi's 4th District was crowded, with four candidates -- Tom Carter, Ron Vincent, Gene Taylor and Tavish Kelly -- competing with incumbent Steven Palazzo for the nomination. Although all precincts are reporting, the winner has not yet been called. Palazzo is just over the 50% mark, and due to a mix-up at the polls, some ballots will have to be counted by hand. After official numbers are released, if Palazzo has any less than 50% of the vote, he will go into a runoff against Taylor on June 24, 2014.[56]

Matt Moore defeated Trish Causey in the Democratic primary. In the general election, Joey Robinson will run from the Libertarian Party and Sarge Jackson will run from the Reform Party. Both Cindy Burleson and Ed Reich are running as independent candidates.[16][54]

Montana

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Montana, 2014

There is one seat up for grabs in Montana's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party holds Montana's only congressional seat.

Members of the U.S. House from Montana -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 0 Pending
     Republican Party 1 Pending
Total 1 1

At-Large District

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Montana, 2014

With Republican incumbent Steve Daines running for U.S. Senate rather than re-election to the House, five Republican candidates competed for the nomination in the primary: Elsie Arntzen, Matt Rosendale, Corey Stapleton, Drew Turiano and Ryan Zinke. Zinke arose as the winner. John Lewis beat out John Driscoll for the Democratic nomination, while Mike Fellows ran unopposed as the only Libertarian candidate.[20][57]

New Jersey

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2014

There are 12 seats up for grabs in New Jersey's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Republican Party and Democratic Party each hold six of New Jersey's 12 congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from New Jersey -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 6 Pending
     Republican Party 6 Pending
Total 12 12

District 1

See also: New Jersey's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

With the resignation of Rob Andrews (D), this seat has been vacant since February 2014. Donald Norcross defeated Frank Minor and Frank Broomell, Jr. in the Democratic primary. Garry Cobb beat out Lee Lucas, Gerard McManus and Claire Gustafson for the Republican nomination.[23][58]

District 2

See also: New Jersey's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014 and U.S. House battleground districts, 2014

New Jersey's 2nd Congressional District is a battleground district in 2014. The Cook Political Report and FairVote disagree in their predictions for this race. Cook's Partisan Voter Index (PVI) rates the district as D+1, or barely Democratic.[59] FairVote, on the other hand, rates the district as only 40.4% Democratic, leaning more toward the Republicans.[60] In 2012, the 2nd District voted for Republican incumbent Frank LoBiondo with a safe 17.4% margin of victory. On the other hand, the 2012 presidential race went Democratic, with Barack Obama winning the district by an 8.1% margin of victory.

In the primary election, incumbent Frank LoBiondo defeated Mike Assad in the Republican primary. Bill Hughes, Jr. easily beat out Dave Cole for the Democratic nomination.[23][58]

District 3

See also: New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014 and U.S. House battleground districts, 2014

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is a battleground district in 2014. Both The Cook Political Report and FairVote rate the district as very closely matched between Democratic and Republican voters. Cook's Partisan Voter Index (PVI) rates the district as R+1, or barely Republican.[61] FairVote rates the district as 50.4% Democratic.[62] In 2012, although New Jersey's 3rd District voted for Republican incumbent Jon Runyan with an 8.9% margin of victory, the district also voted for Democratic President Barack Obama with a margin of victory of 4.6%.

With incumbent Jon Runyan not seeking re-election, Republican candidate Tom MacArthur faced a competitive race. Nonetheless, he safely defeated Steve Lonegan, earning for the chance to run in the general election for his seat. Aimee Belgard defeated Howard Kleinhendler and Bruce Todd in the Democratic primary.[23][58] The Republican primary between MacArthur and Lonegan was brutal, and MacArthur even sued the Lonegan campaign for defamation.

District 4

See also: New Jersey's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

Both Republican incumbent Chris Smith and Democratic candidate Ruben Scolavino ran unopposed in their respective primary elections.[23][58]

District 5

See also: New Jersey's 5th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Scott Garrett ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Roy Cho defeated Diane Sare for the Democratic nomination.[23][58]

District 6

See also: New Jersey's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Frank Pallone ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, while Anthony Wilkinson ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[23][58]

District 7

See also: New Jersey's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

Republican incumbent Leonard Lance defeated challenger David Larsen for the nomination in the primary. Janice Kovach ran unopposed in the Democratic primary.[23][58]

District 8

See also: New Jersey's 8th Congressional District elections, 2014

Both Democratic incumbent Albio Sires and Republican candidate Jude Anthony Tiscornia ran unopposed in their respective primary elections.[23][58]

District 9

See also: New Jersey's 9th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Bill Pascrell ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination in the primary, while Dierdre Paul ran unopposed for the Republican nomination.[23][58]

District 10

See also: New Jersey's 10th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Donald Payne, Jr. was challenged by and defeated three candidates in the Democratic primary: Curtis Vaughn, Aaron Fraser and Robert Louis Toussaint. Yolanda Dentley ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[23][58]

District 11

See also: New Jersey's 11th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Rodney Frelinghuysen defeated Rick Van Glahn in the Republican primary. Mark Dunec beat out Lee Anne Brogowski and Brian Murphy for the Democratic nomination.[23][58]

District 12

See also: New Jersey's 12th Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D) is retiring at the end of his term, so four Democratic candidates are hoping to take over his seat in the November general election. Bonnie Watson Coleman defeated Upendra Chivukula, Linda Greenstein and Andrew Zwicker and received the Democratic nomination in the primary. Alieta Eck ran unopposed for the Republican nomination.[23][58]

New Mexico

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in New Mexico, 2014

There are three seats up for grabs in New Mexico's 2014 congressional elections. Heading into the general election, the Democratic Party holds two of New Mexico's three congressional seats.

Members of the U.S. House from New Mexico -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 2 Pending
     Republican Party 1 Pending
Total 3 3

District 1

See also: New Mexico's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Michelle Lujan Grisham ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Mike Frese defeated Richard Priem for the Republican nomination.[25]

District 2

See also: New Mexico's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Both Republican incumbent Steve Pearce and Democratic candidate Roxanne Lara ran unopposed in their respective primary elections.[25]

District 3

See also: New Mexico's 3rd Congressional District elections, 2014

Incumbent Ben Ray Lujan defeated challenger Robert Blanch in the Democratic primary. Jefferson Byrd ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[25]

South Dakota

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in South Dakota, 2014
Members of the U.S. House from South Dakota -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 0 Pending
     Republican Party 1 Pending
Total 1 1

At-Large Congressional District

Incumbent Kristi Noem (R) ran unopposed in the Republican primary, and Corinna Robinson ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Without a primary challenger, Noem, who has a significant lead in the fundraising, has been able to save her campaign funds for the general election. When the race heats up closer to November, Robinson will likely focus on Noem's role in the government shutdown.[63]

See also

External links

References

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