Kyle Flood recall, Kenosha Unified School District, Wisconsin (2014)

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An effort to recall Kyle Flood from the Kenosha Board of Education in Wisconsin was discussed starting in February 2014. Supporters have not yet gathered petitions or filed paperwork with the Kenosha County Clerk as of July 31, 2014.[1]

Recall supporter arguments

District resident and former teacher Kristi Lacroix initiated an online petition in early February 2014 to force Flood's removal from office due to several run-ins with law enforcement. Flood, a student at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, was ticketed by campus police for possession of drug paraphernalia on November 11, 2013, and vandalism in late December 2013. On February 14, 2014, Flood issued an apology but stated that he will not resign from the board.[2] The Board of Education voted 6-0 to censure Flood on February 25, 2014, but has no authority to force his removal from office.[3]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing recall in Wisconsin

Recall supporters would need to submit 9,129 valid signatures from district residents to force a recall election. This total represents of 25 percent of the votes cast by district resident during the 2010 gubernatorial election.[1]

About the board

School board members from left, front row: Rebecca Stevens, Tamarra Coleman, Mary Snyder; from left, back row: Gary J. Kunich, Kyle Flood, Carl Bryan, Dan Wade

The Kenosha Board of Education consists of seven members elected at-large to three-year terms. The board determines compensation for members during the organizational meeting following April elections.[4] The Kenosha Board of Education voted unanimously on 77.97 percent of its votes between December 13, 2013, and June 30, 2014.

  • When the board did not vote unanimously:
    • Only 30.77 percent of the votes did not pass.
    • Tamarra Coleman and Mary Snyder voted together 83.33 percent of the time.
    • Rebecca Stevens and Carl Bryan voted together 92.31 percent of the time.
    • When Coleman and Snyder voted together, Kyle Flood voted with them 50 percent of the time. When Stevens and Bryan voted together, Kyle Flood voted with them 25 percent of the time.
    • In the two board meetings held after they joined the board in April 2014, Gary J. Kunich and Dan Wade voted together 100 percent of the time. They also voted with Coleman and Snyder 100 percent of the time. For both Kyle Flood and the pairing of Stevens and Bryan, Kunich and Wade voted with them 33.33 percent of the time.

The voting data indicates that Tamarra Coleman, Mary Snyder, Gary J. Kunich and Dan Wade are the governing majority on the board. Rebecca Stevens and Carl Bryan are the minority faction and Kyle Flood's voting pattern is not consistent with either faction.[5]

About the district

Kenosha Unified School District is located in Kenosha, Wisconsin
Kenosha Unified School District is located in Kenosha, the county seat for Kenosha County, Wisconsin. Kenosha is home to 100,150 residents, according to the United States Census Bureau.[6] Kenosha Unified School District is the third-largest school district in Wisconsin, serving 22,905 students during the 2011-2012 school year.[7]

Demographics

Higher education achievement

Kenosha underperformed in comparison to the rest of Wisconsin in terms of higher education achievement in 2010. The United States Census Bureau found that 22.9 percent of Kenosha residents aged 25 years and older had attained a bachelor's degree compared to 26.4 percent for Wisconsin as a whole.[6]

Median household income

The median household income in Kenosha was $49,641 in 2010 compared to $52,627 for the state of Wisconsin.[6]

Poverty rate

The poverty rate in Kenosha was 16.2 percent in 2010 compared to 12.5 percent for the entire state.[6]

Racial Demographics, 2010[6]
Race Kenosha (%) Wisconsin (%)
White 77.1 86.2
Black or African American 10.0 6.3
American Indian and Alaska Native 0.6 1.0
Asian 1.7 2.3
Two or More Races 3.8 1.8
Hispanic or Latino 16.3 5.9

Presidential votes, 2000-2012[8]
Year Democratic vote (%) Republican vote (%)
2012 55.4 43.2
2008 58.1 40.1
2004 52.4 46.5

Note: The United States Census Bureau considers "Hispanic or Latino" to be a place of origin, not a race. Therefore, the Census allows citizens to report both their race and that they are from a "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin simultaneously. As a result, the percentages in each column of the racial demographics table will exceed 100 percent. Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin percentages.[9]

See also

External links

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