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Louisiana Property Tax Bidding Process, Amendment 7 (2010)

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Louisiana Constitution
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Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIV
The Louisiana Property Tax Bidding Process, Amendment 7, also known as Act 540, was on the November 2, 2010 statewide ballot in Louisiana as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment where it was approved.

The measure proposed "authorizing a bidder at a tax sale to bid down the existing five percent penalty in increments of one-tenth of one percent; to require the payment of penalties by a bidder at ad valorem property tax sales; to require the payment of interest, penalties, and costs by a taxpayer who is delinquent on the payment of taxes on movables."[1]

Election results

See also: 2010 ballot measure election results
Louisiana Amendment 7 (2010)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No603,87855%
Yes 493,618 45%

Official results via Louisiana Elections Division.

Text of measure

To provide relative to the bidding process for ad valorem property tax sales by authorizing a bidder at a tax sale to bid down the existing five percent penalty in increments of one-tenth of one percent; to require the payment of penalties by a bidder at ad valorem property tax sales; to require the payment of interest, penalties, and costs by a taxpayer who is delinquent on the payment of taxes on movables. (Becomes effective 20 days after the governor proclaims its adoption.) (Amends Article VII, Section 25(A)(1) and (E))[1]

Media editorial positions

See also: Endorsements of Louisiana ballot measures, 2010

Support

  • The Advocate was in support of this measure because it would have set better rules for tax sale auctions and felt that it was fair in the new rules it set out to impose.[2]

Opposition

  • The Shreveport Times was against this measure because it would have added more penalty fines to delinquent taxpayers and take away protections to residents.[3]

Path to the ballot

See also: Louisiana legislatively-referred constitutional amendments

In order to qualify for the ballot the proposed measure required the approval of 2/3rds of the members of both houses of the Louisiana State Legislature.

See also

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