Louisiana state legislative districts

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There are a total of 144 seats in the Louisiana State Legislature. All 39 seats of the Louisiana State Senate and all 105 seats of the Louisiana House of Representatives are up for election every four years.

Chambers

Senate

The Louisiana State Senate is the upper house of the Louisiana State Legislature. 39 members serve as state senators and are elected to four-year terms in the State Senate.[1] The senate meets at the State Capitol in Baton Rouge. Each member represents an average of 116,240 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[2] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 114,589 residents.[3]

House

The Louisiana House of Representatives is the lower body of the Louisiana State Legislature. The House consists of 105 members and meets at the State Capitol in Baton Rouge. Members of the House serve four-year terms with term limits, limiting representatives to three terms (a total of twelve years).[1] Each member represents an average of 43,175 residents as of the 2010 Census.[4] After the 2000 Census, each member represented approximately 42,562 residents.[5]

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Qualifications

In order to run for office, the following qualifications are in place:[6]

  • Must be 18 years of age or older.
  • Must be a resident of the district they seek to hold office to for a minimum of two years.
  • Must not have served more than two and one half terms previously in office. This is for any candidate who has held office in the past after January 8, 1996.
  • Have not been convicted of a felony offense.
  • Have no outstanding fines with the Louisiana Ethics Administration Program.
  • Pay a $225 filing fee with the Clerk of Court in the parish they reside in or collect 400 signatures.
  • If running as a Republican or Democrat, pay an additional $112.50 filing fee with the state and/or parish executive committee of their party.

Vacancies

See also: How vacancies are filled in state legislatures
How Vacancies are filled in State Legislatures
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If there is a vacancy in the senate, the vacant seat must be filled by a special election. An election is required if there is six months or more left in the unexpired term. The Senate President must call for an election no later than 10 days after the vacancy happened. The Senate President must determine the dates for the election along with all filing deadlines. The person elected to the seat serves for the remainder of the unexpired term.[7]

Term limits

See also: State legislatures with term limits

The Louisiana legislature is one of 15 state legislatures with term limits. Of the 15 states, it is the only state where term limits were imposed by the state's legislators, rather than through the ballot initiative process. Under Louisiana's term limits, state senators can serve no more than three 4-year terms in the senate.[1]

The state's term limits law was enacted in 1995. The first year that the term limits enacted in 1995 impacted the ability of incumbents to run for office was in 2007.

Districts

These are links to every district in the Louisiana State Senate.

Qualifications

In order to run for office, the following qualifications are in place:[8]

  • Must be 18 years of age or older.
  • Must be a resident of the district they seek to hold office to for a minimum of two years.
  • Must not have served more than two and one half terms previously in office. This is for any candidate who has held office in the past after January 8, 1996.
  • Have not been convicted of a felony offense.
  • Have no outstanding fines with the Louisiana Ethics Administration Program.
  • Pay a $225 filing fee with the Clerk of Court in the parish they reside in or collect 400 signatures.
  • If running as a Republican or Democrat, pay an additional $112.50 filing fee with the state and/or parish executive committee of their party.

Vacancies

See also: How vacancies are filled in state legislatures
How Vacancies are filled in State Legislatures
NevadaMassachusettsColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaVacancy fulfillment map.png

If there is a vacancy in the house, the vacant seat must be filled by a special election. An election is required if there are six months or more left in the unexpired term. The Speaker of the House must call for an election no later than 10 days following the vacancy. The Speaker of the House must determine the dates for the election along with all filing deadlines. The person elected to the seat serves for the remainder of the unexpired term.[9]

Term limits

See also: State legislatures with term limits

The Louisiana legislature is one of 15 state legislatures with term limits. Of the 15 states, it is the only state where term limits were imposed by the state's legislators, rather than through the ballot initiative process. Under Louisiana's term limits, state representatives can serve no more than three 4-year terms in the house.[1]

The state's term limits law was enacted in 1995. 2007 was the first year that the term limits law impacted the ability of incumbents to run.

Districts

These are links to every district in the Louisiana House of Representatives.

See also

External links

References