Maine State Senate elections, 2014

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Maine State Senate elections, 2014

Majority controlQualifications
List of candidates
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24District 25District 26District 27District 28District 29District 30District 31District 32District 33District 34District 35
State Legislative Election Results

Maine State Senate2014 Maine House Elections
BattlegroundRace.jpg

The Maine State Senate was a must-win for the Republican Party. With Republican Gov. Paul LePage and Democratic challenger Mike Michaud in a statistical dead-heat in polling heading into the elections, the Democrats were presented an opportunity to make Maine a state government trifecta.[1] Republicans made a strong push in 2014, flipping the upper house, a chamber they had not held in the previous 32 years, to a 20-15 advantage.

Both the Democrats and the Republicans viewed the race in District 9 between Democratic District 32 incumbent Geoffrey Gratwick and Republican ex-mayor of Bangor Cary Weston as a key opportunity. District 9, which includes Bangor, was a swing district in 2014.[2] Gratwick ultimately defeated Weston.

MaineCare, the state's Medicaid program, was seen as a centerpiece issue in the legislative elections. Republicans looked to tie the fiscal troubles of the state program to the federal Affordable Care Act, whereas Democrats were focused on selling the benefits of expansion to voters.[3]

Out of the 35 seats in the Maine State Senate, 34 had two major party candidates running in the election. Of the eight retiring incumbents, four were Democrats and one was an Independent who caucused with the Democrats.[4]

The Maine State Senate was one of 20 state legislative chambers noted by Ballotpedia staff as being a 2014 battleground chamber. The Maine Senate had a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republicans of four seats, which amounted to 11.4 percent of the 35-member chamber. In 2012, a total of 14 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were seven districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another seven districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Elections for the office of Maine State Senate took place in 2014. A primary election took place on June 10, 2014, and a general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature-filing deadline for party candidates wishing to run in this election was March 17, 2014. The deadline for write-in candidates to run in the primary election was April 28, 2014, and the deadline for non-party candidates to run in the general election was June 2, 2014.

Following the general election, the Republican Party gained control of the Maine State Senate. The Democratic Party previously held the majority control of the chamber with 19 seats. However, following the general election, that number dropped to just 15 seats. The Republicans, on the other hand, increased their seats from 15 to 20, and gained control of the chamber. The chamber's vacant seat was also filled during the general election.

The Secretary of State's office ordered recounts in four races. Results that were challenged include the victories of Michael Thibodeau, Catherine Breen, Chris Johnson and Nathan Libby. Michael Carpenter had originally requested a recount but withdrew the request. He lost to Michael Willette.[5]

Incumbents retiring

A total of eight incumbents did not run for re-election in 2014. Those incumbents were:

Name Party Current Office
Richard Woodbury Grey.png Nonpartisan Senate District 11
Gary Plummer Ends.png Republican Senate District 12
Margaret Craven Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 16
Patrick Flood Ends.png Republican Senate District 21
Edward Mazurek Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 22
Emily Ann Cain Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 30
Roger Sherman Ends.png Republican Senate District 34
Troy Dale Jackson Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 34

Majority control

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Maine State Senate:

Maine State Senate
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 19 15
     Republican Party 15 20
     Independent 1 0
Total 35 35

Qualifications

Section 6 of Part 2 of Article 4 of the Maine Constitution states, "The Senators shall be 25 years of age at the commencement of the term, for which they are elected, and in all other respects their qualifications shall be the same as those of the Representatives."

Section 4 of Part 1 of Article 4 of the Maine Constitution states, "Qualifications; residency requirement. No person shall be a member of the House of Representatives, unless the person shall, at the commencement of the period for which the person is elected, have been 5 years a citizen of the United States, have arrived at the age of 21 years, have been a resident in this State one year; and for the 3 months next preceding the time of this person's election shall have been, and, during the period for which elected, shall continue to be a resident in the district which that person represents."

2014 Competitiveness Overview
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Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Competitiveness

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In all but one of the 35 districts up for election, there were candidates from both major parties running for election. One Democrat, incumbent Anne Haskell, was guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Primary challenges

A total of two incumbents (5.7%) faced primary competition on June 10. Eight incumbents (22.9%) did not seek re-election and another 25 incumbents (71.4%) advanced past the primary without opposition. The state senators facing primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Eight incumbent senators did not run for re-election, while 27 (77.1%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents (four Democrats, three Republicans and one independent) can be found above.

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Maine

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Maine's population increased by 4.2 percent between 2000 and 2010, rising from 1.27 million to 1.33 million.[7] The southwestern part of the state, particularly the area near the New Hampshire border and around the city of Portland, had the highest levels of population density and growth, while northern parts of the state accounted for little of Maine's total population or growth.[8]

Maine was the only state that would have drawn new Congressional and state legislative maps in 2013 rather than before the 2012 elections, but a June 2011 court ruling required that the Congressional maps be drawn sooner.[9][10] New Congressional districts were in place for the 2012 elections, but new state legislative maps were not drawn until 2013. Thus, the new state legislative maps will first be used in the 2014 election.

Context

Republicans had only controlled the Maine State Senate for four years in the 32 years prior to 2014. They only needed to pick up three seats, however, to gain control of the chamber. This landed it on the Republican State Leadership Committee's list of 16 chambers targeted to flip in 2014. Republicans gaining control of this chamber was seen as necessary to prevent a Democratic state government trifecta, as Gov. Paul LePage (R) trailed his opponent Mike Michaud (D) in most polling.[2]

Republicans believed that the varying views and infighting within the state's political party was actually a strength when compared to the state Democratic party. Republican spokesman David Sorensen said, "Overtime there has been increasing tendency of the Democratic caucus to be in lockstep. When everyone is voting 90 percent like each other, you’ve got a situation where what may be popular in Portland isn’t necessary popular in Presque Isle." Sorensen said that Republicans, on the other hand, could find success with moderate candidates in one part of the state while running more conservative candidates in another.[2]

Although Ballotpedia analysis concluded that only the Senate appears to be among the most competitive races, the Republican Legislative Campaign Committee and the Republican Legislative Campaign Committee classified both chambers as part of their "Sweet 16 Targets."[11]

The 2014 elections were the first under new district maps, which were deemed a compromise in a relatively smooth redistricting process. Maine requires a two-thirds vote by the legislature to approve district maps.[12] Incumbents did not face each other in any Senate district in 2014; two House districts featured a major party incumbent against an unenrolled incumbent.

In addition to the Legislature, the governor's office was also up for election. Gov. Paul LePage (R) faced U.S. Sen. Mike Michaud (D) and Eliot Cutler (I). Democrats hoped that Michaud's election combined with maintaining control of the legislature would lead to the quick enactment of legislation that did not succeed in 2013. Cutler, a centrist, suggested that he might serve as "political shelter" for like-minded legislators, although the Portland Press Herald noted that his positions lined up more closely with Democrats.[13]

An issue seen as a centerpiece of the legislative elections was the proposed expansion of the state's Medicaid program, MaineCare. Republicans look to tie the fiscal troubles of the state program to the federal Affordable Care Act, whereas Democrats looked to sell benefits of expansion to voters.[14]

Another issue of import to Democrats was the proposed increase in the state minimum wage.[13] According to a September survey carried out by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center, 60 percent of 589 likely voters said they would strongly support such an increase. However, Andrew Smith, the center's director, said that the issue may factor into votes but is unlikely to become a major issue in the campaign, as most Mainers earn more than the current minimum wage of $7.50 per hour.[15]

Maine has operated a public campaign fund since the 1996 passage of the Clean Elections law, under which candidates may opt to pull from the fund in return for rejecting all other money. By the end of September 2014, 51 percent of legislative candidates had chosen Clean Elections money, the lowest rate since the start of the program. In 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a section of the law that allowed for additional funds in the event of considerable outspending on the part of other candidates.[16] Outside groups spent about $400,000 on legislative races, with a record-breaking $4.2 million spent on the gubernatorial race.[17]

Races to watch

The following table details the key races in the November 4 general election for the Maine State Senate.

2014 Races to Watch, Maine State Senate
District Candidate 1 Candidate 2
District 7 Ted Koffman (D) Brian Langley (R)
District 9 Geoffrey Gratwick (D) Cary Weston (R)
District 13 Chris Johnson (D) Leslie Fossel (R)
District 20 John Cleveland (D) Eric Brakey (R)
District 22 Guy Desjardins (D) Garrett Mason (R)
District 25 Catherine Breen (D) Cathy Manchester (R)
District 30 James Boyle (D) Amy Volk (R)
Bold=Incumbent

CentralMaine.com identified the following as races to watch in 2014:[18]

  • District 7: Incumbent Brian Langley (R) defeated Theodore Koffman (D). The race was considered a tossup. One vulnerability for Langley was his vote against Medicaid expansion, which Koffman used to campaign against him.[19]
  • District 9: Incumbent Geoffrey Gratwick (D) defeated Cary Weston (R). Gratwick and Weston once served on the Bangor City Council together. The 2012 race in the Bangor area became the most expensive legislative race in Maine's history. Some believed Weston had a favorable match-up because he was both an ex-Bangor mayor and, more importantly, held no legislative record for Democrats to attack. MaineCare played a particularly central role in this race.[2][3][20]
  • District 13: Incumbent Chris Johnson (D) defeated Leslie Fossel (R). This was a rematch of a 2012 race where outside groups spent more than $75,000 to attack Fossel. This race was one of four scheduled for a recount to take place two weeks after the election.[5]
  • District 20: Incumbent John Cleveland (D) was defeated by Eric Brakey (R). Brakey is a 25 year-old and new to the district. His January campaign fundraising figures bested any other candidate in Maine's history, and he was endorsed by U.S. Senator Rand Paul.
  • District 22: Incumbent Garrett Mason (R) defeated Guy Desjardins (D). Mason won by a narrow 28-vote margin in 2012 and was viewed as more vulnerable to the Androscoggin County sheriff Desjardins. On the other hand, recent redistricting was in favor of the Republicans.
  • District 30: Incumbent James Boyle (D) was defeated by Amy Volk (R). Volk was at the front of a number of high-profile issues in the house, and the district became more conservative due to redistricting.

The following race also garnered attention:

  • District 25: In the race for the district's open seat, Catherine Breen (D) narrowly defeated Cathy Manchester after William Gardiner withdrew.[21] Unofficial results showed Breen winning by 32 votes; a recount two weeks after the election controversially showed Manchester winning by 11 votes, leading Democrats to decry "phantom ballots" in the town of Long Island. The race will be formally decided by a vote of the Senate after a special committee's investigation revealed that what appeared to be 21 extra ballots for Manchester were nonexistent and that the same number of ballots had been counted twice, leaving Breen as the apparent winner.[22][5][23]

List of candidates

District 1

Note: Incumbent Dawn Hill (D) ran for re-election in District 35.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Candidate ballot accecss
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Democratic Party Charles Theriault: 7,107
Republican Party Peter Edgecomb: 7,935 Green check mark transparent.png

District 2

Note: Incumbent Ronald Collins (R) ran for re-election in District 34.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Michael Carpenter: 7,394
Republican Party Michael Willette: 7,626 Green check mark transparent.png

District 3

Note: Incumbent John Tuttle (D) ran for re-election in District 33.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Rodney Whittemore Approveda - District 26 incumbent Whittemore first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Craig Heavey: 5,004
Republican Party Rodney Whittemore: 10,103 Green check mark transparent.png

District 4

Note: Incumbent David Dutremble (D) ran for re-election in District 32.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party David Ziemer: 3,804
Republican Party Paul T. Davis: 11,615 Green check mark transparent.png

District 5

Note: Incumbent Linda Valentino (D) ran for re-election in District 31.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Lincoln withdrew after the primary; Mitchell McLaughlin was named as her replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party James Dill: 8,638 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Mitchell McLaughlin: 6,052

District 6

Note: Incumbent James Boyle ran for re-election in District 30.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • David C. Burns Approveda - District 29 incumbent Burns first assumed office in 2012.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Anne Perry: 6,796
Republican Party David C. Burns: 8,474 Green check mark transparent.png

District 7

Note: Incumbent Rebecca Millett (D) ran for re-election in District 29.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Brian Langley Approveda - District 28 incumbent Langley first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Theodore Koffman: 8,458
Republican Party Brian Langley: 10,384 Green check mark transparent.png

District 8

Note: Incumbent Justin Alfond (D) ran for re-election in District 27.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Edward Youngblood Approveda - District 31 incumbent Youngblood first assumed office in 2012.

Note: Youngblood withdrew after the primary; Kimberley Rosen was named as his replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Paul P. Davis: 7,569
Republican Party Kimberley Rosen: 9,671 Green check mark transparent.png

District 9

Note: Incumbent Anne Haskell (D) ran for re-election in District 28.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Geoffrey Gratwick: 7,538 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Cary Weston: 6,677

District 10

Note: Incumbent Stanley Gerzofsky (D) ran for re-election in District 24.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Andre Cushing Approveda - District 33 incumbent Cushing first assumed office in 2012.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Jaric Fontaine: 4,597
Republican Party Andre Cushing: 10,434 Green check mark transparent.png

District 11

Note: Incumbent Richard Woodbury (I) did not seek re-election.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Michael Thibodeau Approveda - District 23 incumbent Thibodeau first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Jonathan Fulford: 8,974
Republican Party Michael Thibodeau: 9,109 Green check mark transparent.png

Note: This race was subject to a recount; the outcome was not affected.[24]

District 12

Note: Incumbent Gary Plummer (R) did not seek re-election.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party David Miramant: 9,162 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Paula Sutton: 8,434

District 13

Note: Incumbent James Hamper (R) ran for re-election in District 19.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Chris Johnson Approveda - District 20 incumbent Johnson first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Chris Johnson: 9,492 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Leslie Fossel: 9,146

District 14

Note: Incumbent John Patrick (D) ran for re-election in District 14.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
Independent Unaffiliated candidates:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party David Bustin: 7,219
Republican Party Earle McCormick: 9,741 Green check mark transparent.png
Independent Gary Quintal: 1,504

District 15

Note: Incumbent John Cleveland (D) ran for re-election in District 20.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:

Note: Blodgett withdrew after the primary; Rebecca Cornell du Houx was selected as her replacement.

Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Roger Katz Approveda - District 24 incumbent Katz first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Rebecca Cornell du Houx: 4,600
Republican Party Roger Katz: 11,938 Green check mark transparent.png

District 16

Note: Incumbent Margaret Craven (D) did not seek re-election.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Colleen Lachowicz Approveda - District 25 incumbent Lachowicz first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Fortier withdrew after the primary; Scott Cyrway was named as his replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Colleen Lachowicz: 6,936
Republican Party Scott Cyrway: 8,523 Green check mark transparent.png

District 17

Note: Incumbent Garrett Mason (R) ran for re-election in District 22.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Thomas Saviello Approveda - District 18 incumbent Saviello first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Joanne Dunlap: 4,869
Republican Party Thomas Saviello: 12,529 Green check mark transparent.png

District 18

Note: Incumbent Thomas Saviello (R) ran for re-election in District 17.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • John Patrick Approveda - District 14 incumbent Patrick first assumed office in 2010.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Knight withdrew after the primary; Joseph Martin was selected as his replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party John Patrick: 9,136 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Joseph Martin: 7,714

District 19

Note: Incumbent Eloise Vitelli (D) ran for re-election in District 23.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • James Hamper Approveda - District 13 incumbent Hamper first assumed office in 2012.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Rose Rogers-Wells: 6,234
Republican Party James Hamper: 10,386 Green check mark transparent.png

District 20

Note: Incumbent Chris Johnson (D) ran for re-election in District 13.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • John Cleveland Approveda - District 15 incumbent Cleveland first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party John Cleveland: 7,144
Republican Party Eric Brakey: 10,138 Green check mark transparent.png

District 21

Note: Incumbent Patrick Flood (R) did not seek re-election.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Nathan Libby: 6,646 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Patricia Gagne: 6,563

District 22

Note: Incumbent Edward Mazurek (D) did not seek re-election.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Garrett Mason Approveda - District 17 incumbent Mason first assumed office in 2010.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Guy Desjardins: 7,264
Republican Party Garrett Mason: 9,633 Green check mark transparent.png

District 23

Note: Incumbent Michael Thibodeau (R) ran for re-election in District 11.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Eloise Vitelli Approveda - District 19 incumbent Vitelli first assumed office in 2013.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
Green Party June 10 Green Party primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Eloise Vitelli: 7,880
Republican Party Linda Baker: 8,916 Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Alice Knapp: 2,243

District 24

Note: Incumbent Roger Katz (R) ran for re-election in District 15.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Stanley Gerzofsky Approveda - District 10 incumbent Gerzofsky first assumed office in 2008.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
Green Party June 10 Green Party primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Stanley Gerzofsky: 9,779 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Jennifer Johnson: 6,933
Green Party Fred Horch: 3,518

District 25

Note: Incumbent Colleen Lachowicz (D) ran for re-election in District 16.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: David Savage withdrew before the primary. On June 20, Gardiner announced his intention to withdraw from the general election; he endorsed Cathy Manchester as a replacement candidate.[21] Manchester was ultimately selected.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Catherine Breen: 10,930 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Cathy Manchester: 10,898

Note: According to election night results, Breen won the race by 32 votes, which was mirrored in the official canvass released in December. A recount held on November 18 reversed the outcome of the race, with Manchester at 10,927 votes and Breen at 10,916. Breen did not agree with the result, leaving the issue to be decided by the Senate with the advice of a committee appointed by the Senate President. Breen was still recognized by the Maine Secretary of State as the district's senator-elect and was expected to be seated when the chamber met on December 3. However, the Senate voted to seat Manchester.[25][22][26]

Democrats have objected to the recount result due to 21 additional ballots in the town of Long Island, all for Manchester, bringing the vote count above the tally taken on election night, which unofficial results matched.[27]

District 26

Note: Incumbent Rodney Whittemore (R) ran for re-election in District 3.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Call withdrew after the primary. Stuart "Toby" Pennels replaced Call on the general election ballot but withdrew following an August 3 motorcycle accident; he passed away in early September.[28] Kaile Warren was named as Pennels' replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party William Diamond: 10,389 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Kaile Warren: 6,087

District 27

Note: Incumbent Douglas Thomas (R) ran for re-election in District 4.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Justin Alfond Approveda - District 8 incumbent Alfond first assumed office in 2008.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
Green Party June 10 Green Party primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Justin Alfond: 11,376 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Peter Doyle: 2,612
Green Party Asher Platts: 2,852

District 28

Note: Incumbent Brian Langley (R) ran for re-election in District 7.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Anne Haskell Approveda - District 9 incumbent Haskell first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Russell withdrew after the primary.

Green Party June 10 Green Party primary:

Note: Unterreiner withdrew after the primary. Owen Hill was named as her replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Anne Haskell: 11,934 Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Owen Hill: 4,185

District 29

Note: Incumbent David C. Burns (R) ran for re-election in District 6.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Rebecca Millett Approveda - District 7 incumbent Millett first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Ridge withdrew after the primary; William DeSena was named as his replacement.

Green Party June 10 Green Party primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Rebecca Millett: 9,926 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party William DeSena: 6,527
Green Party Mark Diehl: 2,073

District 30

Note: Incumbent Emily Ann Cain (D) ran for Congress.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • James Boyle Approveda - District 6 incumbent Boyle first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party James Boyle: 9,139
Republican Party Amy Volk: 10,295 Green check mark transparent.png

District 31

Note: Incumbent Edward Youngblood (R) ran for re-election in District 8.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Linda Valentino Approveda - District 5 incumbent Valentino first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Linda Valentino: 9,785 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Michael Coleman: 6,604

District 32

Note: Incumbent Geoffrey Gratwick (D) ran for re-election in District 9.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • David Dutremble Approveda - District 4 incumbent Dutremble first assumed office in 2012.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party David Dutremble: 8,740 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party James Booth: 7,067

District 33

Note: Incumbent Andre Cushing (R) ran for re-election in District 10.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: McGee withdrew after the primary. David Woodsome was named as his replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party John Tuttle: 6,033
Republican Party David Woodsome: 8,736 Green check mark transparent.png

District 34

Note: Incumbent Roger Sherman (R) did not seek re-election due to term limits.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:
  • Ronald Collins Approveda - District 2 incumbent Collins first assumed office in 2010.
Independent Unaffiliated candidates:

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Gary Connor: 6,600
Republican Party Ronald Collins: 8,523 Green check mark transparent.png
Independent Richard Burns (Maine Families Party): 2,305

District 35

Note: Incumbent Troy Dale Jackson (D) ran for Congress.

Democratic Party June 10 Democratic primary:
  • Dawn Hill Approveda - District 1 incumbent Hill first assumed office in 2010.
Republican Party June 10 Republican primary:

Note: Weaver withdrew after the primary. John Carson was named as his replacement.

November 4 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Dawn Hill: 10,701 Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party John Carson: 7,142

See also

External links

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References

  1. Huffington Post, "Bill Clinton hitting the campaign trail for Paul LePage challenger," August 27, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Washington Times, "Battle for control of Maine Legislature heating up," July 27, 2014
  3. 3.0 3.1 Morning Sentinel, "Health care to dominate the 2014 Maine Legislature races," March 22, 2014
  4. Boston Globe, "14 Maine legislative races still uncontested," July 25, 2012
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Bangor Daily News, "Recounts in 4 Maine Senate races scheduled to begin Friday," November 13, 2014
  6. Department of the Secretary of State, "Secretary of State Matt Dunlap Announces Results of Democratic Primary Contest Recount in Senate District 33, Part of York County," June 19, 2014
  7. Bangor Daily News, "Maine’s population grows by 4.2 percent," December 21, 2010
  8. U.S. Census Bureau, "2010 Census: Maine Profile," accessed August 27, 2012
  9. Stateline, "As redistricting gets underway, New Jersey is already gridlocked," March 10, 2011
  10. The Portland Press Herald, "Court orders Maine to do redistricting much earlier," June 10, 2011
  11. Associated Press, "National Republicans target Maine Legislature," July 17, 2014
  12. Portland Press Herald, "Maine commission unanimously approves redistricting," May 31, 2013
  13. 13.0 13.1 Portland Press Herald, "Maine elections have implications for minimum wage, taxes, MaineCare," September 16, 2014
  14. Morning Sentinel, "Health care to dominate the 2014 Maine Legislature races," March 22, 2014
  15. Portland Press Herald, "Increase in minimum wage favored in Maine poll," September 20, 2014
  16. [1] Bangor Daily News, "Barely half of Maine’s legislative candidates tap public campaign fund, a record low since Clean Election Act passed," October 1, 2014]
  17. Portland Press Herald, "Groups’ spending on Maine elections hits record $4.6 million," September 24, 23-24, 2014
  18. CentralMaine.com, "Maine’s top 2014 legislative races look a lot like 2012," March 22, 2014
  19. Facebook: Ted Koffman for State Senate, "Koffman reaffirms support for Medicaid expansion," May 2, 2014
  20. Daily Kos, "2014 State Senate races in Maine: Will the Democrats keep their majority?" April 3, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 The Forecaster, "New Republican candidate emerges to challenge Falmouth Democrat Breen in Maine Senate District 25," June 20, 2014
  22. 22.0 22.1 Bangor Daily News, "Maine Senate votes to seat GOP candidate Manchester in still-contested race," December 3, 2014
  23. Bangor Daily News, "Democrat wins Senate election after investigation reveals ‘phantom ballots’ for GOP opponent did not exist," December 9, 2014
  24. Maine Secretary of State, "Recount Results show Thibodeau Remains Winner in Senate District 11," November 14, 2014
  25. Maine Secretary of State, "Senate District 25 recount will go to the Senate," November 18, 2014
  26. Maine Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions, "Tabulations for Elections held in 2014," accessed December 3, 2014
  27. The Brad Blog, "'Phantom' Ballots in Maine State Senate Recount Reverse Result From Democratic to Republican," November 28, 2014
  28. Portland Press Herald, "Army vet, Maine Senate candidate from Casco dies from accident injuries," September 4, 2014