Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




Mark Fisher (Massachusetts)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mark Fisher
Placeholder image2.png
Do you have a photo that could go here? Submit it for this profile by emailing us!
Candidate for
Governor of Massachusetts
PartyRepublican
Education
High schoolWestfield High (1976)
Bachelor'sWorcester Polytechnic Institute (1983)
Associate'sHartford State Technical College (1979)
Master'sWorcester Polytechnic Institute
Personal
Birthday1958
Place of birthWestfield, Massachusetts
ProfessionBusiness owner
Websites
Campaign website
BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Know more information about this profile?
Submit a bio
Mark Fisher was a Republican candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in the 2014 elections.[1] Fisher owns a metal manufacturing business, Merchant’s Fabrication, located in Auburn.[2]

Fisher lost the Republican nomination to Charles D. Baker at the convention held on March 22, 2014 after failing to acquire 15% of the vote. Baker held 83% of the vote while Fisher came just shy of the threshold at 14.765%. Fisher was about 6 votes away, out of over 2,500 cast, from facing Baker in a primary election.[3]

Education

  • High school: Westfield High, 1976
  • A.S.: Hartford State Technical College, (now Capital Community College) nuclear engineering technology, 1979
  • B.S.: Worcester Polytechnic Institute, mechanical engineering, 1983
  • Raytheon
  • M.S.: Worcester Polytechnic Institute, manufacturing
  • M.B.A.: Worcester Polytechnic Institute[4]

Elections

2014

See also: Massachusetts gubernatorial election, 2014

Fisher was a Republican candidate for election to the office of Governor of Massachusetts. Fisher did not make the ballot as a Republican primary candidate when he missed receiving the mandatory 15% of the vote at the primary convention by 6 votes. 2,533 votes were cast; 14.765% went to Fisher, 82.708% to Charles D. Baker, and 64 "blank votes." Blank votes ways for delegates who do not support either candidate to show their presence at the convention.[5]

Fisher's campaign believes that there was possible collusion between the Massachusetts Republican party and Baker's campaign, along with improper conduct at the convention. Debbie McCarthy, Fisher's campaign manager, said the campaign was considering filing two lawsuits. One lawsuit would dispute the convention results while the other would allege the collusion between the state party and Baker's campaign, a violation of party rules.[6] The civil suit would call for the release of e-mails, texts, and phone records to prove the collusion. A Massachusetts Republican party official said both the vote and the process were fair.[5]

Had Fisher made the ballot, Baker would have had to defend his more moderate views as a Republican, and work to distance himself from the Democratic candidates. Baker supports both abortion rights and gay marriage, a contrast to many views of conservative Republican supporters.[5]

Several delegates said that the convention was "messy," and that the pen and paper voting process, with the time it takes to tally the votes, can help kindle conspiracy theories surrounding a close vote. Along with a lack of electronic voting, the convention does not have any rules in place to support a recount.[5]

The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

Issues

Massachusetts Turnpike

As governor, Fisher stated his first priority would be to remove all tolls on the Massachusetts Turnpike.[1]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Mark + Fisher + Massachusetts + Governor"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Mark Fisher News Feed

  • Loading...

See also

Personal

Fisher and his wife, college sweetheart Margaret Mary O’Brien, have two children and reside in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts.[4]

External links

Light Bulb Icon.svg.png
Suggest a link
Campaign Facebook
Campaign Twitter
Campaign YouTube

References