Maryland state legislative districts

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
There are a total of 188 seats in the Maryland General Assembly. All 47 seats of the Maryland State Senate and all 141 seats of the Maryland House of Delegates are up for election every four years. The Maryland House employs 47 three-member districts, allowing its boundaries and those of the state Senate to be one and the same.[1]

Chambers

Senate

The Maryland State Senate is the upper house of the Maryland General Assembly. 47 members serve in the State Senate and serve four-year terms with no term limits. Each member represents an average of 122,842 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[2] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 112,691 residents.[3]

House

The Maryland House of Delegates is the lower house of the Maryland General Assembly. The House of Delegates meets at the State Capitol in Annapolis. There are 141 members elected to four-year terms. The current four-year term structure was instituted in 1922. From 1845 to 1922, Delegates served two-year terms.[4] Each member represents an average of 40,947 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[5]

[edit]

Qualifications

Section 9 of Article 3 of the Maryland Constitution states, "A person is eligible to serve as a Senator or Delegate, who on the date of his election, (1) is a citizen of the State of Maryland, (2) has resided therein for at least one year next preceding that date, and (3) if the district which he has been chosen to represent has been established for at least six months prior to the date of his election, has resided in that district for six months next preceding that date.

If the district which the person has been chosen to represent has been established less than six months prior to the date of his election, then in addition to (1) and (2) above, he shall have resided in the district for as long as it has been established.

A person is eligible to serve as a Senator, if he has attained the age of twenty-five years, or as a Delegate, if he has attained the age of twenty-one years, on the date of his election.

Vacancies

See also: How vacancies are filled in state legislatures
How Vacancies are filled in State Legislatures
NevadaMassachusettsColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaVacancy fulfillment map.png

The Governor is responsible for filling all vacancies in the senate.[6]

The Governor has 30 days after the vacancy to make an appointment based on the recommendations of the political party committee that holds the vacant seat. The political party committee has up to 30 days after the vacancy to submit a list of recommended candidates to the Governor. If the party committee fails to act within the 30 day deadline, the Governor has 15 days to appoint a person from the political party that last held the seat.[7]

The person appointed to the seat serves for the remainder of the unfilled term.[8]

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the Maryland legislature are paid $43,500/year. Legislators receive $100/day for lodging. Additionally, they receive $42 for meals and $225/day for out-of-state travel (which includes meals/lodging).[9]

Districts

These are links to every district in the Maryland State Senate.

Qualifications

Section 9 of Article 3 of the Maryland Constitution states, "A person is eligible to serve as a Senator or Delegate, who on the date of his election, (1) is a citizen of the State of Maryland, (2) has resided therein for at least one year next preceding that date, and (3) if the district which he has been chosen to represent has been established for at least six months prior to the date of his election, has resided in that district for six months next preceding that date.

If the district which the person has been chosen to represent has been established less than six months prior to the date of his election, then in addition to (1) and (2) above, he shall have resided in the district for as long as it has been established.

A person is eligible to serve as a Senator, if he has attained the age of twenty-five years, or as a Delegate, if he has attained the age of twenty-one years, on the date of his election."

Vacancies

See also: How vacancies are filled in state legislatures
How Vacancies are filled in State Legislatures
NevadaMassachusettsColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaVacancy fulfillment map.png

The Governor is responsible for filling all vacancies in the house.[10]

The Governor has 30 days after the vacancy to make an appointment based on the recommendations of the political party committee that holds the vacant seat. The political party committee has up to 30 days after the vacancy to submit a list of recommended candidates to the Governor. If the party committee fails to act within the 30 day deadline, the Governor has 15 days to appoint a person from the political party that last held the seat.[11]

The person appointed to the seat serves for the remainder of the unfilled term.[12]

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the Maryland legislature are paid $43,500/year. Legislators receive $100/day for lodging. Additionally, they receive $42 for meals and $225/day for out-of-state travel (which includes meals/lodging).[13]

Districts

These are links to every district in the Maryland House of Delegates.

See also

External links

References

  1. Maryland Department of Planning, "Maryland Legislative Districts," accessed May 1, 2014
  2. census.gov, "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," accessed May 15, 2014
  3. U.S. Census Bureau, "States Ranked by Population," April 2, 2001. Accessed February 13, 2014
  4. Maryland House of Delegates, Origin & Functions
  5. census.gov, "Population Distribution and Change: 2000 to 2010," accessed May 15, 2014
  6. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsection (a)(1))
  7. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsections (a)(1) and (a)(2))
  8. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsection (a)(4))
  9. NCSL.org, "2012 State Legislator Compensation and Per Diem Table," accessed March 18, 2013
  10. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsection (a)(1))
  11. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsections (a)(1) and (a)(2))
  12. Maryland General Assembly, "Maryland Constitution," accessed December 16, 2013(Referenced Section, Article III, Section 13, Subsection (a)(4))
  13. NCSL.org, "2012 State Legislator Compensation and Per Diem Table," accessed March 18, 2013