Massachusetts Rent Control Prohibition Initiative, Question 9 (1994)

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The Massachusetts Rent Control Prohibition Initiative, also known as Question 9, was on the November 8, 1994 ballot in Massachusetts as an initiated state statute. It was approved.

The initiative prohibited rent control for most privately owned housing units and nullified certain existing rent control laws.

Election results

Question 9 (Rent Control Prohibition)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 1,034,599 46.3%
No980,73643.9%

Official results via: The Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth

Text of measure

This proposed law would prohibit rent control for most privately owned housing units in Massachusetts, and would nullify certain existing rent control laws, except that cities and towns would be authorized to adopt a restricted form of rent control for a six month period, after which compliance by property owners would be voluntary.

The proposed law would prohibit any city or town from enacting, maintaining or enforcing any law that requires below-market rents for residential properties. It would also prohibit the regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, condominium conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent control, if such regulation was part of a system requiring below-market rents. Existing state and local rent control laws would be nullified. The proposed law would not affect publicly owned or subsidized housing, federally assisted housing, or mobile homes.

Cities and towns would be authorized to adopt rent control for a six-month period on housing units that have a fair market rent of $400 or less and that are owned by a person or entity owning ten or more rental units. Such rent control could not include the regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, condominium conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent control. The city or town would have to pay the owners of rent-controlled units the difference between the controlled rent and the fair market rent. After six months, owners of rent-controlled units would not be required to comply with the rent control regulation or with any other such regulation that the city or town might adopt in the future.

The proposed law would take effect on January 1, 1995. The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect.[1][2]

See also

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References

  1. Secretary of the Commonwealth, Public Document No. 43 Massachusetts Election Statistics 1994
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.