Menlo Park City School District bond proposition, Measure W (November 2013)

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A Menlo Park City School District bond proposition, Measure W ballot question was on the November 5, 2013, election ballot for voters in the Menlo Park City School District in San Mateo County, which is in California. It was approved.

The district estimated the tax rate required to fund the Measure W bond issue to be $8.7 per $100,000 of assessed valuation.[1]

A 55 percent supermajority vote was required for approval.

Election results

Measure W
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 4,222 75.3%
No1,38324.7%
These final, certified results are from the San Mateo County elections office.

Text of measure

The question on the ballot:

Measure W:

“To support high quality education, avoid student overcrowding at our existing schools as enrollment continues to increase, and renovate and expand educational facilities at the O’Connor Elementary School site planned to reopen in Menlo Park’s Willows neighborhood, all as described in the Bond Project List, shall the Menlo Park City School District issue $23 million of bonds at legal interest rates, establish an independent citizens’ oversight committee, perform annual audits, and use no bond money for teacher or administrator salaries?”[1][2]

Support

YesOnW2013.png

Support Menlo Park Schools led the campaign in favor of Measure W.[3]

Supporters

Officials

  • State Senator Gerald Hill (D-13)
  • State Assemblymember Rich Gordon (D-24)
  • Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor
  • Don Horsley, San Mateo County Supervisor
  • Dave Pine, San Mateo County Supervisor
  • Warren Slocum, San Mateo County Supervisor
  • Peter Ohtaki, Mayor of Menlo Park City Council
  • Ray Mueller, Vice Mayor of Menlo Park City Council
  • Rich Cline, Menlo Park City Council Member
  • Kirsten Keith, Menlo Park City Council Member
  • Catherine Carlton, Menlo Park City Council Member
  • Ben Eiref, Vice Chair of the Menlo Park Planning Commission
  • Katie Ferrick, Menlo Park Planning Commissioner
  • Virginia Chang Kiraly, Menlo Park Fire Protection District Board Member
  • Robert Silano, Menlo Park Fire Protection District Board Member

Former officials

  • Steve Schmidt, Former Menlo Park Mayor
  • Jack O'Malley, Former Menlo Park Planning Commissioner

Organizations

  • San Mateo County Democratic Party[4]

Trustees

  • Olivia G. Martinez, Sequoia Union High School District Trustee
  • Alan Sarver, Sequoia Union High School District Trustee
  • Chris Thomsen, Sequoia Union High School District Trustee
  • Allen Weiner, Sequoia Union High School District Trustee
  • Mark Box, Former Menlo Park City School District Trustee
  • Bruce Ives, Former Menlo Park City School District Trustee
  • Carol Orton, Former Menlo Park City School District Trustee
  • Jeff Child, Menlo Park City School District Board of Trustees
  • Maria Hilton, Menlo Park City School District Board of Trustees
  • Joan Lambert, Menlo Park City School District Board of Trustees
  • Laura Rich, Menlo Park City School District Board of Trustees
  • Terry Thygesen, Menlo Park City School District Board of Trustees

Individuals

  • Kristen Gracia, Vice Principal of Oak Knoll School
  • Carol Orton, Small Business Owner
  • Tom LeMieux, Realtor
  • Rebecca Bloom, Community Volunteer
  • Nancy Kessler, Community Volunteer

Arguments

Proponents of Measure P had outlined their arguments in the League of Women Voters’ Voter Guide. The arguments included the following:[5]

  • Measure W will resolve the need for additional classrooms and educational facilities due to population growth.
  • The 25-year bond is estimated to cost the school district's property owners an annual average of $8.70 per $100,000 of assessed (not market) value. That's a small amount.

Opponents

The League of Women Voters of California could not identify any opponents or opposing arguments, as stated in their voter's guide.[5]

Tax Rate Summary

The following tax rate summary was provided by the League of Women Voters of California:[5]

An election will be held in the Menlo Park City School District (the "District") on November 5, 2013, to authorize the sale of up to $23,000,000 in bonds of the District to finance school facilities as described in the measure. If the bonds are approved, the District plans to sell the bonds in one series over a period of approximately one year. Principal and interest on the bonds will be payable from the proceeds of tax levies made upon the taxable property in the District. The information presented in numbered paragraphs 1-3 below is provided in compliance with Sections 9400-9404 of the Elections Code of the State of California.

1. The best estimate of the maximum tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is no more than eighty-seven one hundredths of a cents per $100 ($8.70 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2014-15.
2. The best estimate of the maximum tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the last series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is no more than eighty-seven one hundredths of a cent per $100 ($8.70 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2014-15.
3. The best estimate of the highest tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund this bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is eighty-seven one hundredths of a cent per $100 ($8.70 per $100,000) of assessed valuation, which is estimated to apply in fiscal year 2014-15. Approval of the ballot measure authorizes the issuance of bonds under certain conditions, and is not approval of a specific tax rate or a specific bond issuance plan. The tax rate estimates in this statement reflect the District's current projection of future assessed values and of future debt service payments, which are based on certain assumptions. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount and repayment structure of bonds sold, market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The dates of sale of the bonds and the amount and repayment structure of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on its need for construction funds, its intention to meet the tax rate targets stated above, the legal limitations on bonds approved by a 55% vote, and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds are sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale. Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process. Voters should note that the estimated tax rates are based on the ASSESSED VALUE of taxable property in the District as shown on the County's official tax rolls, not on the property's market value. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills to determine their property's assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

[2]

See also

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