Missouri Paper Ballot Initiative (2008)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot
The Missouri Paper Ballot Initiative did not appear on the November 4, 2008 statewide ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment. The measure would have required Missouri's voting process to be conducted on paper ballots.

Ballot summary

Specifically, according to the ballot text it would have:[1]

  • Required all elections after January 1, 2009, be conducted using hand-marked, serially numbered paper ballots;
  • Capped the number of registered voters per precinct at 600;
  • Required absentee ballots received by the U.S. Postal Service to be delivered to the correct precinct and deposited in the ballot box prior to the polls closing;
  • Required all ballots, including absentees, to be counted and results posted before such ballots are removed from the precinct; and
  • Mandated original ballots to be permanently retained and available for any interested parties’ inspection and copying

Status

The initiative failed to submit enough signatures and therefore did not be appearing on the Missouri 2008 ballot.

Overview

This initiative marked the first attempt at resistance of the electronic voting. There had been a wide spread electronic voting movement since 2000. There had been thousands of reported failures plus key election results that were simply without explanation.[2] It is likely that the initiative will be watched for its potential national impact.

Support

Show me the vote is the campaign that directed the initiative. ShowMeTheVote.Org is a non partisan voting rights organization. Their goal was to build alliances around the state regardless of party affiliation or ideology. "This is not a Democrat, Republican, or Independent issue. Free and fair elections are an American issue," said Phil Lindsey, Director of Show Me the Vote.[3]

The group believed a return to paper ballots would:

  • Return of citizen access to and participation in elections.
  • Stopping inaccurate vote counts, suspected election fraud
  • It would be back the disillusioned voter.

Fiscal impact

Annual costs for local governments were estimated to exceed $15,000,000 with additional unknown costs for permanent ballot storage.[4]

Opposition

no information yet

See also

External links

References