Montana Direct Corporate Contribution in Ballot Issues, I-125 (1996)

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The Montana Direct Corporate Contribution in Ballot Issues Initiative, also known as I-125, was on the November 5, 1996 ballot in Montana as an initiated state statute, where it was approved. The measure prohibited direct corporate contributions or expenditures toward the support or defeat of ballot measures. The measure also set a voluntary spending limit of $150,000 per year for ballot issue committees.[1][2]

Aftermath

The legislation of I-125 was expanded by House Bill 575, which was put up to a veto referendum in 1998 before being struck down in courts.

Election results

Montana I-125 (1996)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 201,186 52.35%
No183,11447.65%

Election results via: Montana Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:[3]

Current law prohibits corporations from making direct contributions to political candidates or to political committees that support or oppose candidates or political parties. This initiative would prohibit direct corporate contributions or expenditures toward the support or defeat of ballot issues. It would allow contributions by non-profit corporations that do not: engage in business activities, allow for-profit corporations as members, or accept more than 5% of their revenue from for-profit corporations. The initiative also would set a voluntary spending limit for ballot issue committees of $150,000 per year and allow them to advertise compliance with that limit.
Fiscal Statement: Administrative costs for the Commissioner of Political Practices would be $2,500 in fiscal year 1997 and then $1,500 per year.

[4]

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