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Nevada Senate Bill 325 (2013)

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Nevada Senate Bill 325 (2013)
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Legislature:Nevada Legislature
Text:SB 325
Sponsor(s):Sen. Patricia Spearman (D-1)
Legislative History
Introduced:March 18, 2012
State house:April 23, 2013
State senate:April 22, 2013
Governor:Brian Sandoval
Signed:May 22, 2013
Legal Environment
State law:Laws governing ballot measures in Nevada
Code:Nevada Revised State Code

Nevada Senate Bill 325 was sponsored by Senator Patricia Spearman (D-1) and was ultimately passed. It had provisions "relating to elections; requiring an explanation of an advisory question placed on the ballot by the governing body of a county or city to be written in easily understood language; requiring that every initiative, referendum or question placed on the ballot include a digest; eliminating certain obsolete provisions; requiring the governing bodies of certain counties and cities to appoint committees to prepare arguments for and against approval of advisory questions; and providing other matters properly relating thereto." It was approved unanimously in both the Assembly and the Senate and signed by Governor Brian Sandoval on May 22, 2013.[1]

Provisions

The following summary of Nevada Senate Bill 325 was provided on the National Conference of State Legislatures website. It compares previously existing law with the new provisions of SB 325 (new provisions are italicized and underlined):

Existing law requires, for every constitutional amendment or other statewide measure submitted to a vote of the people, a condensation and explanation of the measure to be prepared for inclusion with the ballot. The condensation and explanation must be written in easily understood language and be of reasonable length. (NRS 218D.810, 293.250) Sections 1 and 6 of this bill require the explanation to also include a digest that provides a Existing law authorizes the governing body of a political subdivision to submit a ballot question to the voters of the political subdivision and the governing body of a city or county to submit an advisory question to the voters of the city or county. In both cases, the governing body must provide an explanation of the question. (NRS 293.481, 293.482)

Sections 2 and 3 of this bill require the explanation to be written in easily understood language and to include a digest. The digest must include a clear and concise summary of any existing laws directly related to the question and a summary of how the question adds to, changes or repeals such existing laws. If a question regarding a measure creates, generates, increases or decreases any public revenue in any form, the first paragraph of the digest must include a statement indicating so.

Under existing law, if an initiative, referendum or other question is placed on the ballot in a county whose population is 45,000 or more (currently Carson City and Clark, Elko, Douglas, Lyon and Washoe Counties) by the board of county commissioners of the county or by the governing body of certain entities within the county, the board of county commissioners must appoint a committee of persons who favor approval of the measure and a committee of persons who oppose approval of the measure to prepare arguments advocating or opposing, respectively, approval of the measure for inclusion in the sample ballot. (NRS 295.121) Existing law imposes an identical requirement on the city council of any city whose population is 15,000 or more (currently Boulder City, Carson City, Elko, Fernley, Henderson, Las Vegas, Mesquite, North Las Vegas, Reno and Sparks). (NRS 295.217)

Sections 4 and 5 of this bill:

(1) apply these requirements to all counties and cities; and

(2) clarify that the requirement to appoint such committees applies when the question on the ballot is an advisory question.

Sections 2-3.6 of this bill eliminate obsolete provisions regarding the provision, by the governing body of certain political subdivisions, public or quasi-public corporations or certain other local agencies, of arguments for and against questions on the ballot.[2][3]

See also

External links

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References

  1. Nevada Legislature website, Senate Bill 325, accessed January 20, 2014
  2. National Conference of State Legislatures website, accessed January 20, 2014
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.