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New Hampshire Right-to-Know Oversight Commission

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New Hampshire Right-to-Know Oversight Commission
Leadership: The commission shall elect a chair.
Founded by: New Hampshire Right to Know Law
Website: Right to Know New Hampshire
Powers:
Advise governmental agencies on records requests relating to electronic records.

The New Hampshire Right-to-Know Oversight Commission was established by the New Hampshire Right to Know Law in order to better assist the state in evaluating the open records law regarding electronic communication and expand the law to account for new technological developments.

Duties

The commission is required to study disclosure requirements of emails and other electronic communications as well as public records questions relating to websites, data stored on a computer, and the costs of producing electronic records requests.[1] The act also mandates that the commission release a report at least once a year concerning electronic records.

Membership

The act states that the membership of the commission will be composed of:

I. The members of the oversight commission shall be as follows: (a) Four members of the house of representatives, one from the science, technology and energy committee, one from the municipal and county government committee, one from the judiciary committee, and one other member, appointed by the speaker of the house
(b) Three members of the senate, appointed by the president of the senate.
(c) Three municipal officials, appointed by the New Hampshire Municipal Association.
(d) One school board member, appointed by the New Hampshire School Boards Association.
(e) One school administrator, appointed by the New Hampshire School Administrators Association.
f) Two county officials, appointed by the New Hampshire Association of Counties.
(g) Four members of the public, one of whom shall be an attorney who has knowledge of and experience with the right-to-know law, one of whom shall be an information technology professional, and one of whom shall be a telecommunications professional, all appointed by the governor with the consent of the council.

(h) The attorney general, or designee.[2]

See also

External links

References