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New Jersey Horse Racetrack Betting Amendment (2014)

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A New Jersey Horse Racetrack Betting Amendment did not make the November 4, 2014 ballot in New Jersey as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. At least five measures related to gaming at horse racetracks were proposed thus far in the 2014 legislative session. Assemblyman Ronald Dancer (R-12) sponsored three Assembly Concurrent Resolutions relating to horse racetrack betting: ACRs 72, 120 and 152. ACR 72 would have given the legislature the authority to establish slot machine gambling at horse racetracks with all revenues being dedicated to aid for education.[1] ACR 120 would have also allowed for slot machines at racetracks, but would have left the allocation of the revenues to be provided by statutory law.[2] ACR 152 would have allowed for the same, but with revenues "being dedicated for open space preservation, specifically the acquisition and development of lands for recreation and conservation purposes, for preservation of farmland for agricultural or horticultural use and production, and for historic preservation."[3]

Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D-3) and Sen. Jennifer Beck (R-11) were sponsoring identical measures in the assembly and senate: ACR 105 and Senate Concurrent Resolution 28. The measures would have allowed electronic betting terminals at horse racetracks, off-track wagering facilities and casinos for wagering on historical races or races conducted in the past.[4][5]

Support

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the New Jersey Constitution

At the time in New Jersey, proposed constitutional amendments had two ways of achieving ballot access. The New Jersey Legislature could either qualify it with supermajority approval of 60 percent in one legislative session or with simple majorities in two successive sessions. This measure did not receive the necessary supermajority required for a 2014 ballot placement.

See also

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