New Jersey Retirement Age for Judges and Justices Amendment (2014)

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A New Jersey Retirement Age for Judges and Justices Amendment may appear on the November 4, 2014 ballot in New Jersey as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. At least two measure proposing raising the age for mandatory retirement of judges and justices have been proposed in the 2014 legislative session. Assembly Concurrent Resolution 150, which is being primarily sponsored by Assemblyman David Wolfe (R-10), Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli (R-16) and Assemblyman Erik Peterson (R-23), would raise the mandatory retirement age from 70 to 75.[1] Assembly Concurrent Resolution 150, which is primarily sponsored by Assemblyman John McKeon (D-27) and Assemblywoman Nancy Pinkin (D-18), would raise the retirement to 72.[2]

Both measures would amend Article VI, Section VI, paragraph 3 of the New Jersey Constitution.

Background

See also: New Jersey Constitution, Article VI, Section VI, paragraph 3

New Jersey's state constitution currently mandates retirement of judges and justices at the age of 70.

Support

ACR 129 supporters

ACR 150 supporters

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the New Jersey Constitution

In New Jersey, proposed constitutional amendments have two ways of achieving ballot access. The New Jersey Legislature can either qualify it with supermajority approval of 60 percent in one legislative session or with simple majorities in two successive sessions.

ACR 129 was introduced on March 10, 2014, and was referred to the Judiciary Committee. On June 6, 2014, it was reviewed by the Pension and Health Benefits Commission and recommended to enact.[3]

ACR 150 was introduced on May 15, 2014, and was referred to the Judiciary Committee.[4]

See also

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