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Cities in New Mexico

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This page contains a list of cities in New Mexico, and other information about local governments.

New Mexico allows municipal charter cities. There are 33 total counties in New Mexico. Of those 33:[1]

There are 103 total municipalities in New Mexico. Of those 103, 91 of them are General law, 11 are Home rule charter cities and 1 continues to operate under a territorial charter.[1]

Types of local government

The U.S. Census Bureau's 2012 study of local governments[2] shows that, as of September of 2012, local government in New Mexico consists of:

136 General Purpose units, including:

  • 33 Counties
  • 103 Cities, towns, and villages. Municipalities may incorporate as cities, towns, or villages, but these designations do not significantly affect the legal status of municipalities.

718 Special Purpose units, including:

  • 622 Special Districts
  • 96 Independent School Districts

Further classifications:

  • Home rule charter, adopted pursuant to NM Const. Article X, Section 6 and the Municipal Charter Act, of which there are 11. They are Alamogordo, Albuquerque, Clovis, Gallup, Grants, Hobbs, Las Cruces, Las Vegas, Rio Rancho, and Santa Fe. Los Alamos is consolidated with Los Alamos county and operates under a charter as a city-county government.
  • Silver City continues to be governed by a historic territorial charter.
  • General law cities, towns, and villages, of which there are 91

Initiative process availability

See also: Laws governing local ballot measures in New Mexico

The availability of initiative varies depending upon the home rule status and form of government of a city, town, or village. Charter cities, towns, and villages have an initiative process for charter amendments granted by state statute, but individual charters may contain additional requirements. Charters may adopt initiative for ordinances. General law commission-manager cities, towns, and villages have a mandated initiative process provided by state statutes. General law mayor-council cities, towns, and villages do not have broad initiative authority to propose ordinances. However, for limited matters a petition process is granted by state statutes.[3][4]

10 most populated cities

List of Most Populated Cities in New Mexico
City[5] Population City Type Next election
Albuquerque 552,804 Charter 2015
Las Cruces 99,665 Charter N/A
Rio Rancho 89,320 Charter N/A
Santa Fe 68,642 Charter N/A
Roswell 48,546 General law N/A
Farmington 45,256 General law N/A
Clovis 38,776 Charter N/A
Hobbs 34,488 Charter N/A
Alamogordo 31,327 Charter N/A
Carlsbad 26,296 General law N/A

Full List of Cities

A guide to local ballot initiatives
Local Ballot Initiatives cover.jpg

As of the 2010 Census, there are 103 incorporated cities and towns in New Mexico. Population figures below are based on the updated estimates as of July 1, 2011.[6]

See also

References