New York's 21st Congressional District

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New York's 21st Congressional District
NY District 21 Map.PNG
Current incumbentBill Owens Democratic Party
Population717,663
Gender51.2% Male, 48.8% Female
Race92.6% White, 3% Black
Ethnicity3.1% Hispanic
Unemployment9.4%
Median household income$48,759
High school graduation rate88.1%
College graduation rate21.7%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
New York's 21st Congressional District is located in the northeastern portion of the state and includes Clinton, Franklin, St. Lawrence, Jefferson, Lewis, Hamilton, Essex, Warren, Washington and Fulton counties and parts of Saratoga and Herkimer counties.[1]

The district previously included all or parts of Albany, Fulton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, and Schoharie counties. It contained the cities of Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Amsterdam, Cohoes, Watervliet, Gloversville and Johnstown.

The current representative of the 21st Congressional District is Bill Owens (D). Owens announced in January 2014 that he would not seek re-election in the 2014 midterm elections.[2]

Elections

2014

BattlegroundRace.jpg
See also: New York's 21st Congressional District elections, 2014

The 21st Congressional District of New York will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014. Incumbent Bill Owens (D) announced that he would not run for re-election, and the result has been a toss up race between Republican, Conservative and Independence Party candidate Elise Stefanik and Democratic and Working Families Party candidate Aaron Woolf. Matt Funiciello will also be running against Stefanik and Woolf on the Green ticket. Neither Woolf nor Funiciello faced competition in the primary election on June 24, 2014, while Stefanik battled with Matt Doheny for the Republican nomination. Although Doheny won the Independence Party's nomination, he was later nominated for a state Supreme Court judgeship, which removed him from the ballot and allowed the Independence Party to endorse Stefanik.

New York's 21st is considered a battleground district in 2014. Although Democratic President Barack Obama won the district by a fairly safe 6.1 percent margin of victory in 2012, Owens won by a mere 1.9 percent margin of victory that same year. In addition, with this being an open seat, none of the candidates possess the advantages that often come with incumbency, such as increased campaign finances and name recognition.

General election candidates

*Although Matt Doheny won the Independence primary, he was later nominated for a state Supreme Court judgeship, removing him from the ballot and allowing the Independence Party to endorse Stefanik.[3]


June 24, 2014, primary results

Republican Party Republican Primary


Conservative Party Conservative Primary


Independence Party of America Independence Primary

Democratic Party Democratic Primary


Working Families Party Working Families Primary


Green Party Green Primary

Disqualified

Failed to file


2012

See also: New York's 21st Congressional District elections, 2012

The 21st Congressional District of New York held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent from the 23rd District, Bill Owens won the election in the district.[12]

U.S. House, New York District 21 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngBill Owens Incumbent 47.1% 126,631
     Republican Matthew Doheny 45.3% 121,646
     Green Donald Hassig 1.6% 4,174
     N/A Blank/Void/Scattering 6.1% 16,290
Total Votes 268,741
Source: New York State Board of Elections "U.S. House of Representatives Results"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Paul Tonko won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Theodore Danz (R) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, New York District 21 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Tonko incumbent 56.9% 124,889
     Republican Theodore J. Danz, Jr. 39.1% 85,752
     Blank/Scattering Write-in 4% 8,784
Total Votes 219,425

2008
On November 4, 2008, Paul Tonko won election to the United States House. He defeated James Buhrmaster (R) and Phillip Steck (Independence) in the general election.[14]

U.S. House, New York District 21 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Tonko 54.9% 171,286
     Republican James Buhrmaster 31% 96,599
     Independence Phillip Steck 2.6% 7,965
     N/A Blank/Scattering 11.6% 36,081
Total Votes 311,931

2006
On November 7, 2006, Michael R. McNulty won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Warren Redlich (R) in the general election.[15]

U.S. House, New York , District 21 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMichael R. McNulty incumbent 68.5% 139,997
     Republican Warren Redlich 22.9% 46,752
     Blank/Scattering 8.6% 17,554
Total Votes 204,303

2004
On November 2, 2004, Michael R. McNulty won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Warren Redlich (R) in the general election.[16]

U.S. House, New York , District 21 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMichael R. McNulty incumbent 58.7% 167,247
     Republican Warren Redlich 28.1% 80,121
     Blank/Scattering 13.2% 37,700
Total Votes 285,068

2002
On November 5, 2002, Michael R. McNulty won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Charles B. Rosenstein (R) in the general election.[17]

U.S. House, New York , District 21 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMichael R. McNulty incumbent 63% 128,584
     Republican Charles R. Rosenstein 26.2% 53,525
     Blank/Scattering 10.8% 22,113
Total Votes 204,222

2000
On November 7, 2000, Michael R. McNulty won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Thomas G. Pillsworth (R) in the general election.[18]

U.S. House, New York , District 21 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMichael R. McNulty incumbent 63.1% 157,773
     Republican Thomas G. Pillsworth 24.1% 60,333
     Blank/Scattering 12.7% 31,740
Total Votes 249,846

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 21st Congressional District of New York after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in New York

In 2011, the New York State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

See also

External links

References

  1. New York Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed September 25, 2012
  2. Politico, "New York Democrat Bill Owens to retire from House," accessed January 14, 2014
  3. State of Politics, "Stefanik Lands Indy Line," accessed September 24, 2014
  4. 4.0 4.1 Elise Stefanik for Congress, "Home," accessed March 11, 2014
  5. 5.0 5.1 Capitol Confidential, "Matt Doheny to launch third bid for NY-21," accessed March 11, 2014
  6. 6.0 6.1 Syracuse.com, "Democrats choose filmmaker Aaron Woolf to run for Congress in North Country," accessed February 12, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 New York Board of Elections, "Candidate Petition List," accessed April 14, 2014
  8. WWNY TV, "Macomb's Burke Announces Bid For Congress," accessed March 11, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 WWNY TV 7, "Burke, Hassig Kicked Off Ballot In Congressional Race," accessed May 19, 2014
  10. Joe Gilbert for U.S. Congress, "About Joe," accessed October 24, 2013
  11. Email submission to Ballotpedia on December 30, 2013
  12. Politico, "2012 Election Map, New York," accessed November 7, 2012
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  16. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  17. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  18. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013