Ohio Debt Limitations, Issue 4 (1977)

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The Ohio Debt Limitations Amendment, also known as Issue 4, appeared on the November 8, 1977 ballot in Ohio as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was defeated.[1] This amendment revises limitations on state government indebtedness.

Election results

Ohio Issue 4 (1977)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,999,79172.48%
Yes 759,327 27.52%

Election results via Ohio Secretary of State.[2]

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[3]

Proposed Constitutional Amendment
To adopt Section 1 of Article VIII and repeal Sections 1, 2, 2b, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g, 2h, 3, 7, 9, and 10 of Article VIII and Section 6 of Article XII of the Constitution of Ohio
  1. To repeal the general state constitutional debt limit of $750,000 and replace it with authority to incur debt from capital improvements by a two thirds majority vote of each house of the general assembly within specified limitations directly related to state revenues.
  2. To permit the state to contract debt without limitation on amount of purpose, in addition to the authority specified above, if that debt is submitted to a vote of the electors by a 3/5 majority vote of each house of the general assembly and approved by a majority of the electors voting on the question.
  3. To require the general assembly to retire at least 4% of the state's indebtedness each year.
  4. To permit the state to borrow funds to meet a current year's appropriations if any such loan is repaid out of that year's revenues.
  5. To repeal part of the constitutional requirements relating to a sinking fund and to require that the general assembly provide for the repayment of state debt.
  6. To enumerate purposes and amounts for which the first $640 million of capital improvement that would have to be appropriated.

Shall the proposed amendment be adopted?[4]

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