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Ohio Gubernatorial Vetoes Amendment (1903)

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The Ohio Gubernatorial Vetoes Amendment, also known as Issue 1, was on the November 3, 1903 ballot in Ohio as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. This amendment modifies the Ohio Constitution in relation to gubernatorial vetoes.[1]

Election results

Ohio Amendment 1 (1903)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 458,681 57.55%
No338,31742.45%

Note: A majority of the total 877,203 votes in the entire election (438,602 votes) were needed for the measure to be approved

Election results via: Ohio Secretary of State (1910) (p. 156 & 461)

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

Constitutional Amendment Governor's Veto[1][2][3]

Constitutional changes

ARTICLE II

Sec. 16. Every bill shall be fully and distinctly read three different days, unless in case of urgency three-fourths of the house in which it shall be pending, shall dispense with the rule. No bill shall contain more than one subject, which shall be clearly expressed in its title, and no law shall be revived, or amended unless the new act contain the entire act revived, or the section or sections amended, and the section or sections so amended shall be repealed.

Every bill passed by both houses of the General Assembly shall, before said bill can become law, be presented to the governor. If he approves he shall sign said bill and thereupon said bill shall be law. If he object he shall not sign and shall return said bill, together with his objection thereto in writing, to the house wherein said bill originated, which house shall enter at large upon its journal said objection and shall proceed to reconsider said bill. If, after said reconsideration, at least two-thirds of the members-elect of that house vote to repass said bill it shall be sent, together with said objection, to the other house, which shall enter at large upon its journal said objection and shall proceed to reconsider said bill. If, after said reconsideration, at least two-thirds of the members-elect of that house vote to pass said bill it shall be law, otherwise it shall not be law. The votes for the repassage of said bill shall in each house respectively be no less than those given on the original passage. If any bill passed by both houses of the General Assembly and presented to the governor is not signed and is not returned to the house wherein it originated and within ten days after being so presented, exclusive of Sunday and the day said bill was presented, said bill shall be law as in like manner as if signed, unless final adjournment of the General Assembly prevents such return, in which case shall be law, unless objected to by the governor and filed, together with his objection thereto in writing, by him in the office of the Secretary of State within the prescribed ten days; and the Secretary of State shall at once make public said fact and shall return said bill, together with said objection, upon the opening of the next following session of the General Assembly, to the house wherein said bill originated, where it shall be treated in like manner as if returned within the prescribed ten days.

If any bill passed by both houses of the General Assembly and presented to the governor contains two or more sections, or two or more items of appropriation of money, he may object to one or more of said sections or to one or more of said items of appropriation of money, and approve the other portion of said bill, in which case said approved portion may be signed and then shall be law; and such section or sections item or items of appropriation of money objected to shall be returned within the time and in the manner prescribed for, and shall be separately reconsidered as in the case of a whole bill; but if final adjournment of the General Assembly prevents such return the governor shall file said section or sections, item or items of appropriation of money, together with his objection thereto in writing, with the Secretary of State as in the case of a whole bill, and the Secretary of State shall then make public said fact, but shall not further act as in the case of a whole bill.[1]

Path to the ballot

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Lewis C. Laylin, "Annual Report of the Secretary of the State" (Ohio, 1903)
  2. Youngstown Vindicator, "Sample Ballot," November 2, 1903)
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.