Ohio Issue 2, Legislative Supermajority for Tax Increases (1983)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on Taxes
Taxes.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Ohio Constitution
Seal of Ohio.svg.png
Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIISchedule
The Ohio Legislative Supermajority for Tax Increases Amendment, also known as Issue 2, appeared on the November 8, 1983 ballot in Ohio as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated.[1] This amendment would have required a 3/5ths supermajority in the Ohio State Legislature to pass tax increases.

Election results

Ohio Issue 2 (1983)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,967,12959.23%
Yes 1,354,320 40.77%

Election results via: Ohio Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[2]

Proposed Constitutional Amendment
To amend Article II, Section 15 of the Constitution of the State of Ohio

This proposed amendment would replace the present constitutional majority requirement for the enactment of revenue raising bills in each house of the general assembly with a three-fifths majority vote requirement in each house of the general assembly.
A revenue raising bill is any bill considered by the general assembly that proposes any change in the laws of this state that increases the revenue derived from any tax levied upon any person or taxpayer by any means or methods, including, but not limited to: the imposition of new taxes, increased rates, changes in methods of computation, or changes in deductions, credits, exclusions, exemptions, or definitions.

If adopted, this amendment shall take effect December 8, 1983.

Shall the proposed amendment be adopted?[3]

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. Ohio Secretary of State, "Ohio 1983 ballot measures and election results," accessed July 31, 2013
  2. Daily Times, "Proposed Amendment to the Constitution," October 17, 1983
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.