Ohio Publication of Proposed Amendments and Statutes in Newspapers, Amendment 3 (1923)

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The Ohio Publication of Proposed Amendments and Statutes in Newspapers Amendment was on the November 6, 1923 ballot in Ohio as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was defeated.

This amendment sought to modify Article II,Section 1g, of the Ohio Constitution to allow for the publication of notice of proposed laws and amendments in newspapers.[1]

Election results

Ohio Amendment 3 (1923)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No493,78658.42%
Yes 351,513 41.58%

Election results via: Ohio Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

ARTICLE II,

Section 1-g.
Proposing to amend Article II, section 1-g, of the Constitution of the State of Ohio relative to publication of notice of proposed law or constitutional amendment together with arguments for and against.
Sec. 1-g. Any initiative supplementary or referendum petition may be presented in separate parts but each part shall contain a full and correct copy of the title, and text of the law, section or item thereof sought to be referred, or the proposed law or proposed amendment to the constitution. Each signer of any initiative, supplementary or referendum petition must be an elector of the state and shall place on such petition after his name the date of signing and his place of residence. A signer residing outside of a municipality shall state the township and county in which he resides. A resident of a municipality shall state in addition to the name of such municipality, the street number if any, of his residence and the ward and precinct in which the same is located. The names of all signers to such petitions shall be written in ink, each signer for himself. To each part of such petition shall be attached the affidavit of the person soliciting the signatures to the same, which affidavit shall contain a statement of the number of the signers of such part of such petition and shall state that each the signatures attached to such part was made in the presence of the affiant, that to the best of his knowledge and belief each signature on such part is the genuine signature of the person whose name it purport to be, that he believes the persons who have signed it to be electors, that they so signed said petition with knowledge of the content thereof, that each signer signed the same on the date stated opposite his name; and no other affidavit thereto shall be required. The petition and signatures upon such petitions, so verified shall be presumed to be in all respects sufficient, unless not later than forty days before the election, it shall be otherwise proved and in such event ten additional day shall be allowed for the filing of additional signatures to such petition. No law or amendment to the constitution submitted to the elector by initiative and supplementary petition and receiving an affirmative majority of the votes cast thereon, shall be held unconstitutional or void on account of the insufficiency of the petitions by which such submission of the same was procured; nor shall the rejection of any law submitted by referendum petition be held invalid for such insufficiency. Upon all initiative, supplementary and referendum petitions provided for in any of the sections of this article, it shall be necessary to file from each of one-half of the counties of the state, petitions bearing the signatures of not less than one-half of the designated percentage of the electors of such county. A true copy of all laws, or proposed laws or proposed amendments to the constitution, together with an argument or explanation, or both, for, and also an argument or explanation, or both, against the same, shall be prepared. The person or persons who prepare the argument or explanation, or both, against any law, section or item submitted to the electors by referendum petition, may be named in such petition and the persons who prepare the argument or explanation, or both, for any proposed law or proposed amendment to the constitution may be named in the petition proposing the same. The person or persons who prepare the argument or explanation, or both, for the law, section, or item, submitted to the electors by referendum petition or against any proposed law submitted, by supplementary petition, shall be named by the general assembly, if in session, and if not in session then by the governor. The secretary of state shall either; (a) cause to be printed the law, or proposed law, or proposed amendment to the constitution, together with the arguments and explanations not exceeding a total of three hundred words for each, an also the arguments and explanations, not exceeding a total of three hundred words for each, and also the arguments and explanation not exceeding a total of three hundred words against each, and shall mail, or otherwise distribute, a copy of such law, or proposed law or proposed amendment to the constitution, together with such arguments and explanations for and against the same to each of the electors of the state, as far as may be reasonably possible, or, (b) cause to be prepared such law, or proposed law, or proposed amendment to the constitution, together with the arguments and explanations, not exceeding a total of three hundred words both for and against each, and caused the same to be published in one or more newspapers in each county of the state, once each week, for not for more than three consecutive weeks, last publication thereof to be not less than ten days prior to the day of election [2]

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