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Oklahoma Running-Mate Proposal (2010)

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Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
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The Oklahoma Running-Mate Proposal did not appear on the November 2, 2010 ballot in the state of Oklahoma as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would allow the governor and the lieutenant governor to run on the same ticket as a team, much like the president and the vice president.[1]

The measure was introduced by Representative Gary Banz, who argues that the effects of the measure would allow the governor to choose a trustworthy running mate that could later be trusted in their term or terms. The measure, according to Banz, could potentially save money by decreasing costs of security detail that is usually provided to the lieutenant governor.[2]

Constitutional changes

If enacted by Oklahoma voters, the measure would have amended Article VI, Section 3 of the Oklahoma Constitution by adding section 3.1.[1]

Ballot title

The ballot title that voters would have seen on the ballot read as follows:[1]

This measure amends the Oklahoma Constitution. It adds a new Section 3.1 to Article 6. It deals with the Offices of Governor and Lieutenant Governor. It would provide that a voter would cast one vote for both of these offices. The persons running for these offices would run as a team. The procedure for the joint nomination and election of candidates for those offices would be set by law. This would begin in 2014.

Path to the ballot

The Oklahoma State Legislature can approve a proposed amendment by a majority vote. (However, if the state legislature wants the proposed amendment to go on a special election ballot, it has to approve the amendment by a 2/3rds vote.) Oklahoma is one of ten states that allows a referred amendment to go on the ballot after a majority vote in one session of the state's legislature.

See also

External links

References