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Oregon Abolition of Desert Land and Water Boards, Measure 24 (1914)

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The Oregon Abolition of Desert Land and Water Boards Bill, also known as Measure 24, was on the November 3, 1914 ballot in Oregon as an initiated state statute, where it was defeated. The measure would have abolished the Desert Land Board, vested the board’s powers and duties in the State Land Board, abolished the State Water Board and vested the board’s powers and duties in a State Water Commissioner, who would be appointed by the State Land Board.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 24 (1914)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No143,36681.43%
Yes 34,436 18.57%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Proposed by Initiative Petition

Measure initiated by W. P. George, Salem, Oregon. - ABOLISHING DESERT LAND BOARD AND REORGANIZING CERTAIN STATE OFFICES. - Abolishing the Desert Land Board and vesting its Powers and Duties in the State Land Board. Making State Engineer appointive, by the State Land Board instead of elective as at present; the Engineer in charge of Tumalo Irrigation Project shall act as State Engineer until 1916. Abolishing State Water Board and Office of Superintendents of Water Divisions and substituting therefor a State Water Commissioner to be appointed by the State Land Board; making all officers affected appointive instead of elective as at present. --- Vote YES or NO.

346. Yes


347. No

[2]

Path to the ballot

Measure 24 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State on July 2, 1914.[1]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 5, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.