Oregon Education Stability Fund, Measure 19 (2002)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on
State and Local
Government Budgets
Spending & Finance
State finance.jpg
Policy
Budget policy
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Oregon Constitution
Flag of Oregon.png
Articles
PreambleIIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXX-AXIXI-AXI-BXI-CXI-DXI-EXI-F(1)XI-F(2)XI-GXI-HXI-I(1)XI-I(2)XI-JXI-KXI-LXI-MXI-NXI-OXI-PXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIII

The Oregon Education Stability Fund Amendment, also known as Measure 19, was on the September 17, 2002 ballot in Oregon as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure converted the education endowment fund into a stability fund, specified conditions for utilizing the fund and transferred $150 million from stability fund to State School Fund.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 19 (2002)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 496,815 61.85%
No306,44038.15%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Ballot title

Authorizes Using Education Stability Fund Principal in Specified Circumstances; Transfers $150 Million to State School Fund; Creates School Capital Matching Subaccount in Stability Fund[2]

Support

Many teachers, parents, and local businessess rallied around this measure, agreeing that the creation of a stablity fund will help improve schools and in turn, the communities they are in. Many believe it is the "rainy day fund" that Oregon has needed for a long time.

Some of the people and organizations who publicly supported this measure are:

  • Citizens Alliance for Responsible Education
  • The Coalition for School Funding Now
  • Confederation of Oregon School Administrators
  • State Treasurer Randall Edwards
  • Oregon Business Association
  • Senator Dave Nelson, Republican, Senate Majority Leader
  • Kate Brown, Democrat, Senate Minority Leader

Opposition

Some of those who opposed the measure were quick to remind voters that Measure 19 is closely related to a 2001 measure, which voters rejected. They find fault in the fact that the measure allows the state to take $150 million from the Educational Endowment Fund, money that was there to help Oregonians attend college, and call the measure a "quick fix" rather than a solution to school funding.

Some of those who publicly opposed the measure are:

  • Consumer Justice Alliance
  • Governor Kitzhaber

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References


BallotMeasureFinal badge.png
This historical ballot measure article requires that the text of the measure be added to the page.