Oregon Crime Victim’s Rights and Roles, Measure 10 (1986)

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The Oregon Crime Victim’s Rights and Roles Act, also known as Measure 10, was on the November 4, 1986 ballot in Oregon as an initiated state statute, where it was defeated. The measure expanded crime victims’ rights and role in the criminal justice process, such as in the prosecution and sentencing.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 10 (1986)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 774,766 75.49%
No251,50924.51%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

10. REVISES MANY CRIMINAL LAWS CONCERNING VICTIMS’ RIGHTS, EVIDENCE, SENTENCING, PAROLE
QUESTION - Shall crime victims’ rights and role in criminal justice process be expanded, and changes made in prosecution, evidence, sentencing, parole?

EXPLANATION - Protects victims from pretrial contact by criminal defendant. Bars excluding victim from courtroom during trial. Gives victim role in trial scheduling, sentencing, parole. Requires joint trial of jointly charged defendants unless “clearly inappropriate.” Limits sentence merger for multiple crimes. Sets consecutive sentences rules. Gives state, defendant same number of jury challenges. Expands witness’s prior conviction cross-examination. Expands victims’ compensation rights. Requires that parole last entire term of sentence. Defines “victim” broadly. Makes other changes.

ESTIMATE OF FINANCIAL EFFECT - Passage of this measure will increase, by between $2 million and $4 million, the annual recurring costs for the state court system and the costs for production, defense and parole supervision.

YES □

NO □ [2]

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed December 11, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.