Oregon Department of Industry and Public Works, Measure 27 (1914)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on
Administration of Government
Administration of government.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Oregon Constitution
Flag of Oregon.png
Articles
PreambleIIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXX-AXIXI-AXI-BXI-CXI-DXI-EXI-F(1)XI-F(2)XI-GXI-HXI-I(1)XI-I(2)XI-JXI-KXI-LXI-MXI-NXI-OXI-PXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIII

The Oregon Department of Industry and Public Works Amendment, also known as Measure 27, was on the November 3, 1914 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have established a Department of Industry and Public Works, under control of the State Labor Commissioner, that would have provided employment for unemployed citizens of the State of Oregon and derived the department’s funds from imposing a tax of ten percent on all estates of deceased persons of value of $50,000 or more.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 27 (1914)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No126,20168.57%
Yes 57,859 31.43%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Proposed by Initiative Petition

Constitutional Amendment initiated by the Socialist Party of Oregon, B. F. Ramp, Chairman, Brooks, Oregon, E. L. Cannon, Secretary Treasurer, Salem, Oregon. - DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY AND PUBLIC WORKS AMENDMENT. - Its purpose is to establish, by adding Article XIX to the State Constitution, a department of industry and public works, under control of the State Labor Commissioner providing for the employment of the unemployed citizens of the State of Oregon. The funds therefor to be derived from imposing a tax of not less than ten per cent on all estates of deceased persons of value of $50,000 or over. --- Vote YES or NO.

352. Yes


353. No

[2]

Path to the ballot

Measure 27 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State on July 2, 1914 by the Socialist Party of Oregon.[1]

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 5, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.