Oregon Federal Income Taxes Fully Deductible on State Tax Returns, Measure 91 (2000)

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The Oregon Federal Income Taxes Fully Deductible on State Tax Returns Amendment, also known as Measure 91, was on the November 7, 2000 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have made federal income taxes deductible on state personal income and corporate income tax returns.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 91 (2000)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No814,88555.20%
Yes 661,342 44.80%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Ballot title

Amends Constitution: Makes Federal Income Taxes Fully Deductible On Oregon Tax Returns[2]

Support

[3] Supporters of the initiative argue that the double taxation on income tax in Oregon is wrong and that there should not be a $3,000 cap on deductions. Proponent Bill Sizemore pointed out that even the federal government does not levy income taxes on Oregonians' income taxes, but "allows us to deduct all our state income taxes on our federal tax returns. The Oregon legislature, however, raises hundreds of millions of dollars every year double taxing our incomes."

Supporters

Opposition

[4] Some who oppose the measure argue that reducing the state's revenue will take funds away from much needed programs and servies, such as rural fire protection and emergency medical services, libraries, transportation for seniors and people with disabilities, education, and even The Oregon Health Plan, which helps provide medical care for those who can't afford it.

Others argue that most Oregon taxpayers will receive zero reduction in their state taxes from Measure 91. They said that high income households are the only ones likely to benefit and most people will experience an increase in taxes.

Some of those opposed to the measure are:

  • League of Women Voters of Oregon
  • Jim Hill, Oregon State Treasurer
  • American Electronics Association
  • Oregon Farm Bureau Federation
  • Oregon Healthcare Association

See also

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