Oregon Licensing of the Healing Arts, Measure 3 (1934)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on Healthcare
Health care.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Local Measures
Oregon Constitution
Flag of Oregon.png
Articles
PreambleIIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXX-AXIXI-AXI-BXI-CXI-DXI-EXI-F(1)XI-F(2)XI-GXI-HXI-I(1)XI-I(2)XI-JXI-KXI-LXI-MXI-NXI-OXI-PXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIII

The Oregon Licensing of the Healing Arts Amendment, also known as Measure 3, was on the November 6, 1934 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have vested authority to license “healing arts” professionals in three specific boards for (1) medical physicians and surgeons, (2) chiropractic and naturopathic physicians and (3) spiritual practitioners.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 3 (1934)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No191,83673.09%
Yes 70,626 26.91%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Proposed by Initiative Petition

HEALING ARTS CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT - Purpose: To abolish preliminary examination of applicants for licenses to practice certain branches of the healing art as now provided by statute, and to vest exclusive authority in respective licensing boards of the medical and osteopathic, chiropractic and naturopathic schools to determine the nature and scope of examinations for such applicants; to define standard schools of human healing; to divide healing arts into (1) medical and osteopathic physicians and surgeons, (2) chiropractic and naturopathic physicians, (3) practitioners by spiritual means; to prevent interference by competitive schools of human healing; and to prohibit governmental contracts restricting contributing beneficiaries in their choice of licensed practitioners.
Vote YES or NO


304. Yes. I vote for the proposed amendment.

305. No. I vote against the proposed amendment.

[2]

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 18, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.