Oregon Office of State Printer, Measure 1 (June 1904)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on
Administration of Government
Administration of government.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Oregon Constitution
Flag of Oregon.png
Articles
PreambleIIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXX-AXIXI-AXI-BXI-CXI-DXI-EXI-F(1)XI-F(2)XI-GXI-HXI-I(1)XI-I(2)XI-JXI-KXI-LXI-MXI-NXI-OXI-PXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIII

The Oregon Office of State Printer Amendment, also known as Measure 1, was on the June 6, 1904 ballot in Oregon as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved.[1] The measure empowered the state legislature to provide by law the compensation, powers, duties and the election of the State Printer.[2]

Measure 1 amended Article XII of the Oregon Constitution.[3]

The State Printer performs all public printing for the state. Before Measure 1, the compensation paid to him or her was fixed by law and could be neither decreased or increased during the printer's four-year term.[2]

Election results

Oregon Measure 1 (1904)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 45,334 76.36%
No14,03123.64%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot in the Union Precinct of Columbia County, Oregon[4]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Mark Between the Number and Name of Each Candidate or Answer Voted For.

Office of the State Printer Amendment - - Vote Yes or No

55 Yes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56 No . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Background

The East Oregonian reported that "amending the state constitution relative to the office of state printer" was a direct result of "the inability of the legislature to handle the office of state printer under the present constitutional provision. There has always been friction over the office, and by taking advantage of numerous technicalities the state printer has usually managed to secure a much larger amount in fees than the legislature has thought proper."[2]

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links

References