Oregon Restrictions on Government Zoning Outside of City Limits, Measure 11 (1970)

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The Oregon Restrictions on Government Zoning Outside of City Limits Amendment, also known as Measure 11, was on the November 3, 1970 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have restricted the state and county governments from altering the zoning, subdivision or building code outside city limits, required such changes to be first approved by voters of the area and granted residents initiative and referendum powers over such matters.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 11 (1970)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No342,50355.67%
Yes 272,765 44.33%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

11. RESTRICTS GOVERNMENTAL POWERS OVER RURAL PROPERTY - Purpose: Constitutional Amendment restricts power of legislature, counties and other governmental units to pass future zoning, subdivision or building code legislation affecting land outside city limits. Requires all such legislation to be approved by voters of area affected at a special or general election. Further provides that people who live outside city limits shall have initiative and referendum powers over any zoning, subdivision or building code legislation which affects their area.

YES □

NO □ [2]

Support

Supporters

  • Zoning Adjustment Modification Organization, Inc.[1]

Opposition

Opponents

  • The Women’s Legislative Council[1]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed December 2, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.