Oregon Rural Credits Fund, Measure 10 (1916)

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The Oregon Rural Credits Fund Amendment, also known as Measure 10, was on the November 7, 1916 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure created a Rural Credits Fund, which would be funded through bonds, that would offer loans with five percent interest for purchasing land, livestock and equipment and making improvements to farming infrastructure.[1]

Measure 9 added Section 7 of Article XI of the Oregon Constitution.[2]

Election results

Oregon Measure 10 (1916)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 107,488 56.17%
No83,88743.83%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Constitutional Amendment - Proposed by Initiative Petition

Initiated by the Oregon Referendum League: C. E. Spence, Master Oregon State Grange, Oregon City, Oregon; J. D. Brown, President, Oregon Southern-Idaho Farmers' Educational and Co-operative Union, Arlington, Oregon; T. H. Burchard, Ex-President Oregon State Federation of Labor, 829 East Eleventh Street North, Portland, Oregon. - RURAL CREDITS AMENDMENT - Purpose - To bond state for not over two per cent of assessed valuation of all property therein for "Rural Credits Fund." Bonds from $25.00 to $1000 in series of $50,000, maturing in not over 36 years, interest four per cent, exempt from taxes. State to loan said Fund to owners occupying farm lands, on mortgages not over half land value nor $50 per acre, nor less than $200 nor more than $5000 to one person, small loans preferred. Loans made for: (a) payment for land; (b) purchasing livestock and equipment and making improvements; (c) satisfying incumbrances incurred for such purposes; interest five per cent. --- Vote YES or NO.


318. Yes

319. No [3]

Path to the ballot

Measure 10 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State on July 6, 1916 by the Oregon Referendum League.[1]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 8, 2013
  2. Oregon Blue Book, "Oregon State Constitution," accessed November 8, 2013
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.