Oregon Sentencing Reform Initiative (2010)

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Oregon Sentencing Reform Initiative, also known as Initiatives 53 and 56, did not appear on the November 2, 2010 statewide ballot in Oregon as an initiated state statute. The measure proposed increasing incarceration for some felons and expanding consecutive sentencing authority.[1] According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot.

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title read as follows:[2][3]

Increases incarceration for some felons; expands consecutive sentencing authority; courts may require appropriate drug treatment.

Result of "Yes" Vote: "Yes" vote increases incarceration for some felons; gives courts additional broad discretion to impose consecutive sentences; allows courts to require appropriate drug treatment in 2011.

Result of "No" Vote: "No" vote retains current law regarding felony incarceration allowing consecutive sentences in defined circumstances; requiring Department of Corrections to provide appropriate drug treatment in 2012.

Summary

According to the description prepared by the Oregon Secretary of State:

Current law allows early release of some inmates who have served at least 70 percent of their felony sentences; does not allow reduction of mandatory minimum sentences; requires drug treatment for certain offenders beginning in 2012. Current law presumes that criminal sentences will be served concurrently and allows consecutive sentences only upon specified factual findings by sentencing court. Measure requires all inmates to serve at least 80 percent of original term of incarceration imposed by sentencing court; retains requirement that mandatory minimum sentences may not be reduced. Measure allows courts to require appropriate drug treatment for specified individuals beginning in 2011. Measure presumes that criminal sentences will be served consecutively, but gives trial court additional broad discretion to impose concurrent or consecutive sentences. Other provisions.

Path to the ballot

See also: Oregon signature requirements

According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot. Initiative petitions for statutes required six percent of 1,379,475, or 82,769 signatures. The deadline for filing signatures for the November 2, 2010 ballot was July 2, 2010. According to reports, initiative supporters have already filed 1,210 signatures as of March 31.[4] May 2010 reports indicated that a total of 5,048 signatures had been collected.[5]

See also

Articles

External links

References