Oregon Single Tax, Measure 3 (1922)

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The Oregon Single Tax Amendment, also known as Measure 3, was on the November 7, 1922 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have authorized a single land tax in lieu of all other state taxes.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 3 (1922)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No132,02177.09%
Yes 39,231 22.91%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Constitutional Amendment - Proposed by Initiative Petition

Initiated by The Oregon Single Tax League: Arthur Brock, President, 666 Harold Avenue, Portland, Oregon; Alfred D. Cridge, Vice-president, 954 East 22nd Street North, Portland, Oregon; Christina H. Mock, Secretary, 316 Stock Exchange Building, Portland, Oregon (residence address, Umatilla, Oregon); and J. R. Hermann, Manager, 316 Stock Exchange Building, Portland, Oregon - SINGLE TAX AMENDMENT - Purpose: To amend section 1 of article IX of the constitution of the state of Oregon to read as follows: From July 1, 1923, to and including July 1, 1927, all revenue for maintenance of state, county, municipal and district government shall be raised by a tax on land irrespective of improvements therein or thereon, and thereafter the full rental value of land, irrespective of improvements, shall be taken in lieu of all other taxes for the maintenance of government, and for such other purposes as the people may direct.
Vote YES or NO.


304. Yes

305. No

[2]

Path to the ballot

Measure 3 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State by the Oregon Single Tax League on April 24, 1922.[1]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 13, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.