Oregon Single Tax, Measure 4 (1920)

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The Oregon Single Tax Amendment, also known as Measure 4, was on the November 2, 1920 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have instituted a single tax on the value of land and eliminated all other taxes in the state.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 4 (1920)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No147,42679.82%
Yes 37,283 20.18%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Constitutional Amendment - Proposed by Initiative Petition

Initiated by The Oregon Single Tax League, Harry A. Rice, President, 1640 Front Street, Portland, Oregon; Mrs. Christina H. Mock, Secretary, 151 Seventeenth street, Portland, Oregon. - SINGLE TAX CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT - Purpose: To assess all taxes necessary for the maintenance of state, county, municipal and district government, upon the value of land itself irrespective of the improvements in or on it and to exempt all other property and rights and privileges from taxation, from July 1, 1921, to July 1, 1925; and thereafter to take the full rental value of the land, irrespective of improvements, as taxes, and no other taxes of any kind to be levied, by amending section 1 of article IX of the Oregon constitution. --- Vote YES or NO.


306. Yes

307. No

[2]

Path to the ballot

Measure 4 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State on June 5, 1920 by the Oregon Single Tax League.[1]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 12, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.