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Oregon State Tax Commission to Administer Assessment and Tax Laws, Measure 11 (June 1927)

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The Oregon State Tax Commission to Administer Assessment and Tax Laws Act, also known as Measure 11, was on the June 28, 1927 ballot in Oregon as a veto referendum, where it was defeated, thus overturning the legislation. The measure would have authorized the state tax commission to supervise assessment and enforce tax laws throughout the state.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 11 (June 1927)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No70,87168.92%
Yes 31,957 31.08%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Referred Bill - Referendum Ordered by Petition of the People

Referred by L. B. Smith, 419 Oregon Building, Portland, Oregon - PROPERTY ASSESSMENT AND TAXATION ENFORCEMENT BILL - Purpose: To authorize state tax commission to supervise and control administration of assessment and tax laws, of county assessors, equalization boards and other taxing officers; to examine, test and correct assessors’ work, assess omitted property, reassess improperly valued property, direct county equalization boards to raise or lower valuations; to authorize assessors and tax commission to require production of books, records, and sworn information concerning capital, assets, liabilities, earnings, expenses, taxes, and amount and value of property; authorizing appeals from county boards to state commission and from latter to court; punishing failure to furnish such information and other violations with heavy penalties.
Vote YES or NO.


320. Yes, I vote for the proposed law.

321. No, I vote against the proposed law.


Path to the ballot

Measure 11 was filed in the office of the Secretary of State by L. B. Smith of Portland on May 27, 1927.[1]

See also

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