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Oregon Voting Rights Forfeiture by Criminals, Measure 4 (1944)

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The Oregon Voting Rights Forfeiture by Criminals Amendment, also known as Measure 4, was on the November 7, 1944 ballot in Oregon as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure provided that voting rights be forfeited by conviction of any crime punishable by imprisonment, substituted the constitutional word “insane” for “mentally diseased” and allowed future changes to voting forfeitures to be done through law.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 4 (1944)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 183,855 54.06%
No156,21945.94%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Referred to the People by the Legislative Assembly

AMENDMENT TO AUTHORIZE LEGISLATIVE REGULATION OF VOTING PRIVILEGE FORFEITURE - Purpose: To amend section 3, Article II of the Oregon Constitution which now denies any idiot of insane person the privilege of voting, and provides that such privilege shall be forfeited by conviction of any crime punishable by imprisonment in the penitentiary; by substituting the words “mentally diseased” in lieu of the word “insane”, and providing further that the conviction of any crime punishable by imprisonment in the penitentiary shall cause forfeiture of the voting privilege “unless otherwise provided by law”, thus permitting modification or abolition of such forfeiture by act of the legislature or the people by initiative.
Vote YES or NO


306. Yes. I vote for the proposed amendment.

307. No. I vote against the proposed amendment.

[2]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 19, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.