Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District

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Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District
PA 17th congressional district.png
Current incumbentMatt Cartwright Democratic Party
Population694,123
Gender49.2% Male, 50.8% Female
Race88.67% White, 5.91% Black, 1.24% Asian
Ethnicity7.56% Hispanic
Unemployment9.9%
Median household income$46,722
High school graduation rate88.0%
College graduation rate19.6%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District is located in the eastern region of Pennsylvania and includes Schuylkill, Carbon, Monroe, Luzerne and Lackawanna counties.[1]

The current representative of the 17th Congressional District is Matt Cartwright (D).

Elections

2014

See also: Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 17th Congressional District of Pennsylvania will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 17th Congressional District of Pennsylvania held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Democrat Matt Cartwright won the election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMatt Cartwright 60.3% 161,393
     Republican Laureen Cummings 39.7% 106,208
Total Votes 267,601
Source: Pennsylvania Department of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010

On November 2, 2010, Tim Holden won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Dave Argall (R) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTim Holden incumbent 55.5% 118,486
     Republican Dave Argall 44.5% 95,000
Total Votes 213,486

2008

On November 4, 2008, Tim Holden won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Toni Gilhooley (R) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTim Holden incumbent 63.7% 192,699
     Republican Toni Gilhooley 36.3% 109,909
Total Votes 302,608

2006

On November 7, 2006, Tim Holden won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Matthew A. Wertz (R) and various write-in challengers in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTim Holden incumbent 64.5% 137,253
     Republican Matthew A. Wertz 35.5% 75,455
     N/A Write-in 0% 69
Total Votes 212,777

2004

On November 2, 2004, Tim Holden won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Scott Paterno (R) and Russ Diamond (Libertarian) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTim Holden incumbent 59.1% 172,412
     Republican Scott Paterno 38.9% 113,592
     Libertarian Russ Diamond 2% 5,782
Total Votes 291,786

2002

On November 5, 2002, Tim Holden won re-election to the United States House. He defeated George W. Gekas (R) and various write-in challengers in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTim Holden 51.4% 103,483
     Republican George W. Gekas incumbent 48.6% 97,802
     N/A Write-in 0% 6
Total Votes 201,291

2000

On November 7, 2000, George W. Gekas won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Leslye Hess Herrmann (D) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Pennsylvania District 17 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngGeorge W. Gekas incumbent 71.5% 166,236
     Democratic Leslye Hess Herrmann 28.5% 66,190
Total Votes 232,426

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 17th Congressional District prior to the 2010 redistricting.
See also: Redistricting in Pennsylvania

The Legislative Reapportionment Commission in Pennsylvania approved the GOP-proposed map. It was signed into law on December 22, 2001.[9][10]

External links

See also

References