Pennsylvania elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Pennsylvania held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate (1 seat) Approveda Preview Article
U.S. House (18 seats) Approveda
State Executives (3 positions) Approveda Preview Article
State Senate (25 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (203 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (0 measures) Defeatedd N/A

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

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See also: United States Senate elections in Pennsylvania, 2012
U.S. Senate, Pennsylvania General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngBob Casey, Jr. Incumbent 53.7% 3,021,364
     Republican Tom Smith 44.6% 2,509,132
     Libertarian Rayburn Douglas Smith 1.7% 96,926
Total Votes 5,627,422
Source: Pennsylvania Department of State

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2012

Pennsylvania lost one U.S. House seat from redistricting. In 2012, Republicans held a 13-6 edge in the 19 Congressional districts.

Members of the U.S. House from Pennsylvania-- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 6 5
     Republican Party 13 13
Total 19 18
District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
1st Democratic Party Robert Brady
Republican Party John Featherman
Robert Brady Democratic Party Robert Brady No
2nd Democratic Party Chaka Fattah
Republican Party Robert Mansfield
Independent Robert Ogborn
Independent James Foster (PHP)
Chaka Fattah Democratic Party Chaka Fattah No
3rd Democratic Party Missa Eaton
Republican Party Mike Kelly
IndependentSteven Porter
Mike Kelly Republican Party Mike Kelly No
4th Democratic Party Harry Perkinson
Republican Party Scott Perry
Libertarian Party Mike Koffenberger
IndependentWayne Wolff
Jason Altmire Republican Party Scott Perry Yes
5th Democratic PartyCharles Dumas
Republican PartyGlenn Thompson
Glenn Thompson Republican Party Glenn Thompson No
6th Democratic Party Manan Trivedi
Republican Party Jim Gerlach
Jim Gerlach Republican Party Jim Gerlach No
7th Democratic Party George Badey
Republican PartyPatrick Meehan
Patrick Meehan Republican Party Patrick Meehan No
8th Democratic Party Kathryn Boockvar
Republican Party Michael G. Fitzpatrick
Michael G. Fitzpatrick Republican Party Michael G. Fitzpatrick No
9th Democratic Party Karen Ramsburg
Republican Party Bill Shuster
Bill Shuster Republican Party Bill Shuster No
10th Democratic Party Philip Scollo
Republican Party Tom Marino
Tom Marino Republican Party Tom Marino No
11th Democratic Party Gene Stilp
Republican Party Lou Barletta
Lou Barletta Republican Party Lou Barletta No
12th Democratic Party Mark Critz
Republican Party Keith Rothfus
Mark Critz Republican Party Keith Rothfus Yes
13th Democratic Party Allyson Schwartz
Republican Party Joe Rooney
Allyson Schwartz Democratic Party Allyson Schwartz No
14th Democratic Party Michael F. Doyle
Republican Party Hans Lessmann
Michael F. Doyle Democratic Party Michael F. Doyle No
15th Democratic Party Rick Daugherty
Republican Party Charlie Dent
Charlie Dent Republican Party Charlie Dent No
16th Democratic Party Aryanna Strader
Republican PartyJoseph R. Pitts
IndependentJohn Murphy
IndependentJames Bednarski
Joseph R. Pitts Republican Party Joseph R. Pitts No
17th Democratic Party Matt Cartwright
Republican Party Laureen Cummings
Tim Holden Democratic Party Matt Cartwright No
18th Democratic Party Larry Maggi
Republican Party Tim Murphy
Tim Murphy Republican Party Tim Murphy No

See also: Pennsylvania state executive official elections, 2012

There were three state executive positions up for election.

Attorney General of Pennsylvania General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngKathleen Kane 56.1% 3,125,557
     Republican David Freed 41.6% 2,313,506
     Libertarian Marakay Rogers 2.3% 128,140
Total Votes 5,567,203
Election Results via Pennsylvania Department of State.
Pennsylvania Treasurer General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRob McCord Incumbent 52.5% 2,872,344
     Republican Diana Irey Vaughan 44% 2,405,654
     Libertarian Patricia Fryman 3.5% 190,406
Total Votes 5,468,404
Election Results via Pennsylvania Department of State.
Pennsylvania Auditor General General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEugene DePasquale 49.7% 2,729,565
     Republican John Maher 46.4% 2,548,767
     Libertarian Betsy Summers 3.8% 210,786
Total Votes 5,489,118
Election Results via Pennsylvania Department of State.


See also: Pennsylvania State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state senate.

Pennsylvania State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 20 23
     Republican Party 29 27
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 50 50


See also: Pennsylvania House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state house.

Pennsylvania House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 91 93
     Republican Party 110 110
     Vacancy 2 0
Total 203 203


Eligibility to Vote

Pennsylvania

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Pennsylvania was one of 21 states to use a strictly closed primary system. Voters had to register to vote in the primary by March 25, 2012, which was 30 days before the primary.[1] (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote was 28 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 9.[2]

Note: Some states had a voter registration deadline 30 days prior to the election, but because this could have fallen on a weekend and Columbus Day was on Monday, October 8th, some extended the deadline to October 9, 2012.

  • Voter ID info
  • Residency requirements: Resident of Pennsylvania and the election district at least 30 days before the election.[3]
  • Same-day registration: None

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

A voter is eligible to vote absentee in an election if he or she cannot make it to the polls on election day for one of the following reasons:[4]

  • A person who is or may be in the military service of the United States, regardless of whether at the time of voting the person is present in the election district of residence or in the Commonwealth and regardless of whether he or she is registered to vote.
  • A spouse or dependent residing with or accompanying a person in the military service of the United States and who expects on Election Day to be absent from his or her municipality of residence during the entire period in which the polling places are open for voting (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.).
  • A member of the Merchant Marine and his/her spouse and dependents residing with or accompanying the Merchant Marine, who expect on Election Day to be absent from the Commonwealth or the municipality of residence during the entire period in which the polling places are open for voting (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.).
  • A member of a religious or welfare group attached to and serving with the armed forces and his/her spouse and dependents residing with or accompanying him or her, who expect on Election Day to be absent from the Commonwealth or the municipality of residence during the entire period in which the polling places are open for voting (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.).
  • An individual who, because of the elector's duties, occupation or business (including attendance of college in another county/state, leaves of absence for teaching, vacations and sabbatical leaves), expects on Election Day to be absent from his/her municipality of residence during the entire period the polls are open for voting and the spouse and dependents of such electors who are residing with or accompanying the elector and for that reason also expect to be absent from his/her municipality during the entire period the polls are open for voting (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.).
  • A qualified war veteran elector who is bedridden or hospitalized due to illness or physical disability if the elector is absent from the municipality of his residence and unable to attend his/her polling place because of such illness or disability, regardless of whether the elector is registered to vote.
  • A person who, because of illness or physical disability, is unable to attend his/her polling place or to operate a voting machine and obtain assistance by distinct and audible statements. (Note: A disabled elector may be placed on a permanently disabled absentee file.)
  • A spouse or dependent accompanying a person employed by the Commonwealth or the Federal Government, in the event that the employee's duties, occupation or business on Election Day require him/her to be absent from the Commonwealth or the municipality of residence during the entire period the polls are open for voting (7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M).
  • A county employee who expects that his Election Day duties relating to the conduct of the election will prevent the employee from voting.
  • A person who will not attend a polling place on Election Day because of the observance of a religious holiday.

Deadlines

A request to vote by absentee ballot must be received no later than 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before the election. Completed non-emergency absentee ballots must be received by 5 p.m. on the Friday before Election Day. In presidential election years, absentee ballots received after the state deadline but by the time polls close on Election Day will be counted for the offices of president and vice president.[4]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

2012 developments

Governor of Pennsylvania Tom Corbett gave an executive order, extending the deadline for receipt of completed absentee ballots by the county Board of Elections to 5 p.m. on November 5, 2012. The extension applied to those counties where the Board of Elections was closed due to Hurricane Sandy.[5]

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Pennsylvania is one of seven states that do not have any form of early voting.[6]

See also

Additional reading

References