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Pima County, Arizona

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Budget Y
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Meetings Y
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Elected Officials Y
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Administrative Officials Y
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Permits, zoning Y
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Audits Y
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Contracts Y
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Lobbying N
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Public records Y
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Local taxes Y
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Pima County is one of 15 counties in Arizona. It is located in the south central part of the state, and its county seat is Tucson.

The county is named after the Pima American Indian tribe which was indigenous to the area. The population was 980,263 at the 2010 census.[1] The county seat is Tucson, where nearly all of the population is centered.

Pima County contains parts of the Tohono O'odham Nation, as well as all of the San Xavier Indian Reservation, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ironwood Forest National Monument and Saguaro National Park.

The vast majority of the county population lies in and around the city of Tucson (2010 city population: 520,116), filling much of the eastern part of the county with urban development. Tucson, Arizona's second largest city, is a major commercial and academic center. Other urban areas include the Tucson suburbs of Oro Valley (population 41,011), Marana (population 34,961), Sahuarita (population 25,259), and South Tucson (population 5,652), a large ring of unincorporated urban development, and the growing satellite town Green Valley. The rest of the county is sparsely populated; the largest towns are Sells, the capital of the Tohono O'odham Nation, and Ajo in the far western region of the county.

Website evaluation

This website was most recently evaluated on Jan. 28, 2013.

The good

  • Budget
    • Recommended and adopted budgets are posted.[2]
    • Budgets are archived to 2004.
  • Audit
    • Annual audits are posted.[3]
    • Audits are archived to 1997.
  • Taxes
    • Local tax rates and other tax information is provided at the County Treasurer's Office.[4]
    • A drop down menu under the heading Tax Information includes the local information.
  • Elected Officials
    • Board of supervisors are listed with contact information and email form.[5]
  • Administration
    • Administrative officials’ contact information is available.[6]
  • Board Meetings
    • Board meeting schedule[7] is posted, along with agendas and minutes.[8]
    • Agendas and minutes are archived to 2010.
  • Zoning
    • Building permits and zoning information is available.[9]
  • Contracts
    • All county contracts are available in a searchable database.[10]
  • Public Records

The bad

  • Lobbying
    • If the county engaged in lobbying actives or if it's a member of government lobbying associations are not disclosed. Nor is the total cost lobbying activities or membership dues for associations available.

Elected Officials

Pima County is governed by a five-member Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor District
Ann Day 1
Ramón Valadez, Chairman 2
Sharon Bronson 3
Ray Carroll 4
Richard Elías 5

TOTAL COUNTY BUDGET BY SOURCE AND USE

Taxes

Revenue FY 2010-2011 FY 2011-2012
Taxes 420,814,770 401,959,038
Special Assessment 303,619 264,884
Licenses & Permits 12,480,140 12,954,139
Intergovernmental 361,199,316 321,793,903
Charges for Services 409,746,291 276,114,767
Fines and Forfeits 9,057,190 7,002,215
Interest 4,097,330 1,436,640
Miscellaneous 17,991,732 16,704,338
Memo Revenue 10,000,000 16,704,338
Total 1,245,690,388 1,044,229,924

Spending

The Board of Supervisors has spent $1,605,000 on purchasing additional land for the Sweetwater Preserve[12].

Expenditure FY 2010-2011 FY 2011-2012
Personal Services 431,113,216 419,787,244
Supplies & Services 787,873,763 652,840,769
Capital Outlay 212,910,090 652,840,769
Total 1,431,897,069 1,302,402,322

Lobbying

In 2010, Pima County reported $50,000 spent on lobbying.[13] In 2008, Pima County reported $60,000 spent on lobbying.[14]

External links

References