Political party designation

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A political party designation occurs when a candidate qualifies to run for office as an independent but uses a different label next to his or her name on the ballot.

Some states only allow candidates to use an officially recognized political party name on the ballot. Other states allow candidates to designate any label they choose, so long as it is not too similar to that of an existing party.

Political party designations have not qualified as official political parties in states and would therefore not be entitled to primaries.

Examples

Some examples of party designations include:

States that allow designations

There are 24 states and Washington, D.C. that allow candidates to use political party designations other than those of officially recognized parties in non-presidential elections.[1]

States that do not allow designations

There are 26 states that do not allow candidates to use political party designations other than those of officially recognized parties in non-presidential elections.[1]

**Note: Louisiana and North Dakota allow presidential candidates to choose a label other than than of an officially recognized political party. These states do not allow candidates for other offices to identify in this way.[2]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 These lists were compiled from state-by-state research conducted by Ballotpedia in January 2014.
  2. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.