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Rhode Island Heritage Harbor Museum Bonds, Question 5 (2000)

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Rhode Island Question 5, also known as Heritage Harbor Museum Bonds ($25,000,000), was on the November 7, 2000 election ballot in Rhode Island. Question 5 was a legislatively-referred bond issue. It failed with 51% of voters opposing the measure.[1]

Election results

Rhode Island Heritage Harbor Museum Bonds, Question 5
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No173,65751%
Yes 168,808 49%

Voter guide

The following language appeared in the Rhode Island Voter Information Handbook:[2]

Summary from the Voter Information Handbook: Approval and issuance of these bonds will provide funds for the creation, design, construction, furnishing and equipping of the Heritage Harbor Museum.

How much money will be borrowed? $25,000,000

How will the money be spent?

$25,000,000 would be used for the creation, design, construction, furnishing and equipping of the Heritage Harbor Museum. The new Heritage Harbor Museum is being built at the site of the former South Street Power Plant in Providence, Rhode Island (the former Narragansett Electric Power Plant). The general obligation bond proceeds shall be used to supplement funding available to the project from other sources, including, but not limited to, federal grants, contributions from individuals and other corporations and foundations, State appropriations, and grants from the City of Providence.

Project Timetable: Design of the Museum is expected to commence in November, 2000. Construction is expected to commence in July, 2001 and be completed by November, 2003.

The Department of Administration, based upon information received from the Rhode Island Historical Society, estimates the useful life of the Museum to be approximately 30 years.

Aftermath

The vision for the museum never came to fruition due to financial issues. Plans for the museum collapsed in 2008, and as of 2013, the property intended for the museum was vacant.[3]

See also

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