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San Juan City Commission recall, San Juan, Texas (2010)

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An effort to recall Lupe Rodriguez, Armando Garza, Bob Garza and Eddie Suarez from their positions on the City Commission of San Juan, Texas, was attempted in April 2010.[1] The recall failed due to a lack of verified signatures.

The recall effort is being led by a group called the Concerned Citizens of San Juan. Ramiro Treviño is the head of the recall group, which filed a petition in late February 2010 alleging that all four city commissioners are involved in serious misconduct. The alleged wrongful dismissal of city employees, including the city's former city manager Tony Garza, is one pattern of behavior cited by recall supporters. Recall supporters also say that the four targeted city commission members have undermined the city's bid process. 18 other reasons are cited in the recall petition.

The targeted city commission members say that, on the contrary, the recall committee and those pushing for a recall are nothing more than political operatives in the pay of the political enemies of the targeted commission members.

A state district judge will be called on to decide whether or not a recall election will be held, since a majority of the city commission has been named in the petition, and is therefore not in an appropriate position to make this decision as it ordinarily would in such a case.

The recall failed due to a lack of verified signatures. Organizers originally turned in a petition with 300+ signatures in February 2010. After hearing no response from the city, the petitioners filed suit and were told the recall effort did not obtain signatures from the 10% of registered voters required by the city's charter, which would have been 1,414 signatures. Recall organizers stated they thought the requirement was 10% of the people who actually voted in the last election, not 10% of the total registered.[2]

See also

References